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Credits: 3
Introduces the basic principles of accounting and the recoding of simple business transactions using the double entry system. Includes the accounting procedures of journalizing transactions, posting to the ledger, making a trial balance, creating receipt and disbursement of cash.
Credits: 4

The course examines the accounting methods, principles and terminology needed in the preparation and analysis of financial statements. Included is a study of partnership accounting.

Credits: 4

Continuation of ACC 131, covering corporate accounting, long-term debts, financial analysis, managerial accounting and budgeting concepts.

Prerequisites: ACC 131 – Principles of Accounting I

Credits: 3

This introductory course covers the processes of completing payroll records and implementing payroll procedures. Topics include methods of computing compensation, state and federal laws affecting payroll, mandatory and voluntary payroll deduc­tions, methods of keeping records, and preparation of internal and governmental reports.

Prerequisites: ACC 131 – Principles of Accounting I

Credits: 3

This course develops an understanding of accounting methods for manufacturing and service enterprises. Included are analysis techniques for management’s use of accounting data to aid in product costing, performance measuring, budgeting and other operating decision.

Prerequisites: ACC 132 – Principles of Accounting II

Credits: 4

The course reviews accounting procedures and reporting process­es, including an in-depth analysis of generally applied accounting principles. Topics include the income statement, balance sheet, revenue recognition, cash and marketable securities, inventory, depreciation, cash flows, and notes and accounts receivable.

Prerequisites: ACC 132 – Principles of Accounting II

Credits: 4

The course is a continuation of ACC 231, including an in-depth analysis of the theory and practice of financial accounting for liabilities and equity. Other topics include earnings per share, deferred taxes, pension, leases, accounting changes, error cor­rections and cash flow.

Prerequisites: ACC 231 – Intermediate Accounting I

Credits: 3

Introduces the general theory and procedures pertaining to state and federal taxation. Studies application of laws as they pertain to income of individuals and sole proprietorships, gifts, estates and Social Security.

Prerequisites: ACC 131 – Principles of Accounting I and ACC 132 – Principles of Accounting II

Credits: 2

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the accounting cycle on microcomputers. Topics include general ledgers, accounts receivable and payable, payroll, inventory and depreciation.

Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide hands-on approach to learning how modern computerized accounting systems function. This ap­plication includes the following: general ledger, accounts payable, accounts receivable, bank reconciliation, budgeting, purchase order processing and inventory, sales order processing and inven­tory, fixed assets, and payroll.

Credits: 4

The course is designed to prepare students for successful completion of the Certified Bookkeeper National Certification Examination. Included in the course is a review of adjusting entries, correction of accounting errors, payroll accounting, depreciation, inventory, and internal controls and fraud prevention.

Prerequisites: ACC 131 – Principles of Accounting I

Credits: 2

Provides experience in the application of accounting principles to a simulated retail business.

Grading: P/Q

Credits: 3

On-the-job training experience provides the opportu­nity to apply accounting concepts and procedures in a business setting and to develop proper work attitudes.

Credits: 3

Tabulations, letters, reports and other production work for students with previous instruction in keyboarding, but with insufficient skill to qualify for the next course.

Credits: 2

Provides skills and competencies in basic mathematical functions and in the operation of electronic calculators. Emphasis is on solving business problems and in developing speed and accuracy.

Credits: 3

Includes modern office skills and technologies, including word processing, automation, records management, reprographics, communication services, time management and methods of handling stress, meeting and travel arrangements and career advancement.

Credits: 1

Introduction to Business Professionals of America activities, which includes preparation for state and national competitive events, leadership and professional development.

Grading: P/Q

Credits: 1

Business Professionals of America prepares the student for their chosen profession by assisting them in their leadership and professional development for the workplace. Continuation of ADM 254.

Grading: P/Q

Prerequisites: ADM 254 – Business Professionalism

Credits: 1

A course designed to continue introducing leadership topics and discussion which will increase the professional level of business students.  Students will have the opportunity to take part in leadership development, such as activities of the Iowa Lakes chapter of Business Professionals of America.  This is a continuation of ADM 255.

Grading: P/Q

Prerequisites: ADM 255 – Business Professionalism II

Credits: 1

A course designed to continue introducing leadership topics and discussion which will increase the professional level of business students. Students will have the opportunity to take part in leadership development activities, such as activities of the Iowa Lakes chapter of Business Professionals of America. This is a continuation of ADM 354.

Grading: P/Q

Prerequisites: ADM 354 – Business Professionalism III

Credits: 5

Apprenticeship in office systems. Students work as regular employees in offices supervised by staff members. This work experience is introductory to meet the student’s abilities and career objectives.

Credits: 5

Practical field experience arranged to include office work, direct leadership, and procedures related to career work.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor

Credits: 7

Nursing Concepts I is a class/lab/clinical course that introduces the role of the registered nurse considering history, trends and comportment through a caring perspective. The roles of the registered nurse will be discussed related to safety, legal implications, and collaborative practice throughout the client’s lifespan. The nursing process and health promotion will be introduced related to human needs and the physical assessment. The conceptual focus includes oxygenation, perfusion, elimination, tissue integrity, mobility, sensory alterations and pain. The student will practice and perform nursing skills in the lab and clinical settings while caring for simple client conditions.

Credits: 7

Nursing Concepts II is a class/clinical course that builds upon nursing concepts related to human needs with an emphasis on a safe and effective environment. The student will demonstrate caring behaviors while learning about physiologic adaptations related to perioperative, comfort, pain, infection, fluid and electrolyte, acid/base, metabolism, oxygenation, perfusion, elimination, digestion, and mobility as related to the Medical-Surgical client throughout the lifespan. The nursing process will be utilized throughout the course while applying principles of teaching and learning.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of first semester ADN courses (C or better)

Credits: 4

Pharmacology Applications is a class/lab designed to provide the learner knowledge of pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and pharmcotherapeutics as it relates to the client lifespan. Major drug classifications will be discussed in relation to physiologic systems, with emphasis on application of these agents. Medication administration including oral, parenteral, enteral, and intravenous therapy will be discussed and applied.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of first semester ADN courses (C or better)

Credits: 7

Nursing Concepts III is a class/clinical course that enhances the concepts of critical thinking, complex nursing interventions, and nursing skills using caring behaviors throughout the client’s lifespan. The student will relate concepts of physiologic human needs including: oxygenation, perfusion, developmental and pediatric alterations, intracranial regulation, immunity and inflammation, fluid and electrolytes, cellular regulation, and sensory perception. The role of the registered nurse will be discussed related to maintaining a safe and effective environment through health promotion strategies in case management, utilization review, and quality improvement.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of second semester ADN courses (C or better)

Credits: 4

Behavioral Health Concepts is a classroom/clinical course that introduces foundational nursing practice for the client with human needs of behavioral health and/or mental illness. The student will display caring behaviors while using critical thinking, evidence based practice, and the nursing process to promote a safe and effective environment for clients with behavioral health issues. The student will explore the nurse’s role as provider of care, manager of care, and member of the profession of nursing through communication, health promotion, and maintenance strategies as the student cares for behavioral health clients in the clinical setting.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of second semester ADN courses (C or better)

Credits: 4

Maternal Newborn Concepts is a classroom/clinical course that introduces nursing skills necessary while caring for clients with reproductive and family planning health promotion and maintenance needs. The student will provide a safe and effective environment, use the nursing process, demonstrate critical thinking, evidence based practice, and communication while providing care for the human needs of maternal newborn clients. The student will explore the nurse’s role as provider of care, manager of care and member of the profession of nursing as the student cares for maternal newborn clients in the clinical setting.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of second semester ADN courses (C or better)

Credits: 7

Nursing Concepts IV is a class/clinical or class/preceptorship course that prepares the student for entry level nursing practice by focusing on nursing judgment and assimilation into the profession. Emphasis is on the role of the nurse as the provider and manager of care with simple to complex client conditions throughout the lifespan using evidence based practice interventions while demonstrating positive communication. Management of simple to complex human needs including: oxygenation, perfusion, intracranial regulation, mobility, inflammation/infection/ immunity, tissue integrity, cellular regulation, and comfort/psychosocial. Through management of various clients, the student will explore contemporary nursing practice topics.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of third semester ADN courses (C or better)

Credits: 3

Covers the basic principles of crop production, including classification, soil-plant interrelationships and growth process in response to environment.

Credits: 3

An introduction to basic soil formation, classification, physical properties, water, organic matter, pH, and fertility.

Credits: 2

Course designed to give theoretical knowledge and practical experience in the operation of a combine, grain drying and grain storing equipment.

Credits: 3

Preparation for the student to pass the state of Iowa Commercial Pesticide Applicator Manual examination. Includes the safe use and handling of pesticides.

Credits: 3

Preparation for the student to pass the State of Iowa Commercial Pesticide Applicators Manual (CORE) Examination. Includes the safe use and handling of pesticides.

Credits: 2

Studies soil fertilization, with emphasis on fertilizer material and applications, blending, soil test recommendations and handling in meeting crop needs.

Credits: 2

Course teaches the understanding of the manufacture of fertilizer, physical and chemical characteristics, materials and handling, and new technologies in application of fertilizers, including equipment and materials.

Credits: 1

Students will identify weed and insect pests affecting corn and soybeans along with developing recommendations for potential treatment programs.

Credits: 2

Assists the student in developing the concepts of integrated pest management as they relate to cultural, mechanical, chemical and biological controls.

Credits: 1

An individualized course for students wishing to develop a more in-depth or specialized study of agronomic information.

Credits: 2

This course introduces the basics of professional selling in the agricultural environment. It involves preparing and making a sales presentation for an agricultural product that involves both a written and oral communication component. Topics covered include methods of selling, steps and techniques in the selling process, preparing a product summary and pre-call sheet, prospecting customers, methods for closing a sale, and sales management in agriculture.

Credits: 2

This course is designed to provide students with basic information of concepts and terminology used in agricultural law and the legal system and where to find resources for legal materials.  Topics covered in the course include laws that relate to agriculture, specific laws in agriculture, the use of leases and contracts, tax basics, and how this information applies to real life situations.

Credits: 1

Preparation for using a versatile computerized farm accounting system.

Credits: 2

This course includes current principles and practices of farm business management. Topics include strategic planning, decision making, production enterprise budgets, partial budgets, and cash flow budgets.This course includes current principles and practices of farm business management. Topics include strategic planning, decision making, production enterprise budgets, partial budgets, and cash flow budgets.

Credits: 2

Studies livestock and grain futures marketing methods including product quality, methods and options.

Credits: 3

Introduction to the commodity futures markets, with information on contract specifications, exchanges, basic trading information, and fundamental and technical market information.

Credits: 1

Strategies to increase proficiency in commodity and option marketing. Includes knowledge needed to sit for the Series 3 National Futures Examination.

Credits: 3

This course is a study of the terminology and tools of agricultural finance. It emphasizes the use of credit, preparation of financial documents, evaluating financial condition, and discusses financial risk strategies.

Credits: 3

This course includes basic knowledge of computer hardware, software and operation with an agriculture emphasis. Students will explore agricultural related applications.

Credits: 1

This course teaches American Red Cross basic first aid and American Heart Association cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).  Students will obtain a 10-Hour Occupational Health and Safety Association (OSHA) card, included in this training: tractor safety, chemical safety, and livestock safe handling practices.

Credits: 1

Preparation of the farm management student for entry into the non-family farm job market.

Credits: 1

Studies the application of crop production and animal science production practices through field studies trips. Study trips will involve research farms, industry field days, extension field days and area farms.

Credits: 3

Occupational Experience

Credits: 3

Occupational Experience

Credits: 3

Occupational Experience

Credits: variable

This course is a required on the job training experience in the Agribusiness and Ag Production curriculum. Students work in an agricultural setting gaining employment experiences while applying skills and technologies developed in the classroom.

Credits: 1

This course includes basic machinery maintenance and adjustment of farm equipment.

Credits: 2

A study of hydraulic components, including troubleshooting, removal, repair and replacement.

Credits: 3

This course studies troubleshooting, repairing, removing and replacing hydraulic components.

Corequisites: AGM 114 – Hydraulics I

Credits: 3

This course focuses on testing hydraulic systems on farm equipment.

Credits: 2

This course focuses on testing hydraulic systems on farm equipment.

Corequisites: AGM 116 – Fundamentals of Hydraulic

Credits: 2

Introduction to electric, gas, wire and oxyacetylene welding.

Credits: 3

This course studies basic laws and principles of electricity as they apply to the farm equipment repair industry.

Credits: 2

This lab course applies electrical laws and principles by examining electrical systems of farm equipment.

Corequisites: AGM 300 – Fundamentals of Electricity

Credits: 2

This course studies electrical components of farm equipment, including repair and replacement.

Credits: 3

This lab covers troubleshooting, repairing, removing and replacing electrical components.

Corequisites: AGM 302 – Electrical Components

Credits: 6

This course covers the theory and operation of a basic agricultural engine.

Credits: 5

This course covers the fundamentals of engine overhaul with the emphasis on diesel engines.

Credits: 4

This course covers the maintenance and adjustment of harvesting, planting, tillage, and spraying equipment.

Credits: 2

Study of technical principles and their application to fuel injection systems and turbo chargers, including diagnostics, adjustments, and overhaul procedures.

Credits: 3

This course covers the application of technical principles to fuel systems and turbo chargers, including diagnosis, adjustments, and rebuilding procedures.

Corequisites: AGM 420 – Fuel Systems

Credits: 4

This course covers the theory, diagnosis and service of the complete air conditioning system as applied to farm equipment.

Credits: 6

This course covers the technical principles and their application to drive shafts, universal joints, differentials, differential locks, final drives, and power take off, including diagnosis, repair, adjustment, and overhaul procedures.

Credits: 7

This course covers the theory, operation, construction, and service procedures for transmissions.

Credits: 2

The dealership experience is a four-week block in which each student works as a full-time mechanic in a farm implement dealership.

Credits: 2

This dealership experience is the second four-week block in which each student works as a full-time mechanic in a farm implement dealership.

Credits: 2

An introduction to the use of Global Positioning System (GPS) as it impacts agricultural producers. Students will use field mapping software and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) as part of the class.  Students will gain an understanding of these technologies and analyze their economic impact.

Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to the uses of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Variable Rate Technology (VRT) as they impact agricultural producers. Students will use field mapping software and/or GPS as part of the class.

Credits: 3

This course is an introduction in animal science including vari­ous species and breeds of domestic animals and gives them an appreciation for the principles of production, biological principles, stewardship, and animal industries as they relate to animal pro­duction in the U.S. and the world.

Credits: 2

Animal environment and adaptation, animal health and animal behavior as it relates to production and non-production species.

Credits: 3

This course provides information about the cause, nature, prevention, and treatment of common health problems of farm animals. Topics include identifying animal behavior and developing a herd health program.

Credits: 3

Nutritional principles, digestive systems, composition and nutri­tional characteristics of common feedstuffs, ration formulation and recommended feeding programs for farm animals.

Credits: 1

To provide students with hands on skills in artificial insemination in beef cows.To provide students with hands on skills in artificial insemination in beef cows.

Credits: 2

A study of various aspects of swine production followed by in-depth units on farrowing management and production skills and techniques.

Credits: 2

Course deals with swine management concerns in confinement operations.

Credits: 2

Basic introduction to swine confinement systems and manage­ment, including operation of equipment, ventilation systems and record keeping.

Credits: 2

Basic swine production skills and theory including nutrition, feeding, feed budgeting and feed handling, and general swine management practices to achieve successful grower-finisher and wean-to-finish management.

Credits: 2

Provides an in-depth background for utilizing basic swine man­agement principles.

Credits: 2

This is an introductory course to gain an understanding of the beef cow industry in Iowa and the United States. Students will gain skills of nutrition, economics, and forage utilization through classroom and laboratory activities.

Credits: 2

Management of the beef cow herd with concentration on breed identification, reproduction, genetics, selection, calving manage­ment and record keeping systems.

Credits: 2

Classroom and farm lab instruction covering establishment, man­agement, economics and nutritional value of forage systems for ruminant animals.

Credits: 2

This course introduces students to various aspects of the cattle feeding industry in Iowa and the world with emphasis in the feeder cattle segment of the industry including: cattle trends, facilities, nutrition, health, and management.

Credits: 2

This course brings together all phases of beef feedlot enterprises as they relate to the management areas of marketing, production goals, record systems, record analysis, and carcass quality.

Credits: 1

A hands-on lab where students gain skills in the feeding management of beef enterprises. A course designed to familiarized students with animal environment and adaptation, animal health, and animal behavior as it relates to production and non-production species.

Credits: 1

A hands on lab were students gain hands on skills in beef cow and calf management.

Credits: 1

Provide students with hands on skills in the management of forages.

Credits: 1

A hands on lab were students gain skills in basic production prac­tices needed in the swine life cycle. (Breeding, farrowing, nursery and finishing)

Credits: 1

A hands on lab where students gain skills needed to effectively manage Technician level employees. Also includes production record data input, records analysis and development of work lists to manage the swine operation.

Credits: 3

This course introduces the basics of animal identification, hus­bandry, behavior, safety and healthcare. Career opportunities in animal related fields are explored. The student will also complete the American Red Cross Animal First Aid and CPR certification.

Credits: 4

This course provides instruction in anatomy and physiology of domestic animals. The course focus is on digestive, nervous and sensory, endocrine and urinary systems. Lab activities focus on structure identification and dissection of related body systems of domestic animals.

Credits: 4

This course provides instruction in anatomy and physiology of domestic animals. The course focus is on skeletal, musculature, renal, ophthalmic, cardiac and respiratory systems. Lab activi­ties focus on skeletal identification and dissection of related body systems of domestic animals.

Credits: 2

Introduction to word parts, directional terminology, and analysis of common veterinary terms.

Credits: 3

This course covers the study of drugs and other pharmaceuticals used in veterinary medicine. Emphasis will be on drug usage, client education, calculations, measurement, administration, in­ventory, and storage. This course will give a detailed outline of the technician’s role and responsibility in the pharmacy.

Credits: 3

Animal Nutrition provides instruction regarding essential nutrients and the role of each in an animal’s metabolism. Topics include ba­sic clinical and therapeutic nutrition, pet food analysis, nutritional deficiencies, and toxins. Emphasis is on dogs and cats with an introduction to large anima

Credits: 3

Includes an overview of veterinary practice management and office procedures, with basic filing, record keeping, telephone etiquette, cash drawer management, and the economics of veterinary practice. Instruction on the use of veterinary practice management computer software is provided.

Credits: 3

Discusses moral, ethical and legal principles applicable to vet­erinarians and their employees, breeders, kennel operators, pet groomers and other allied to the small animal industry. Considers state, local and federal regulations relating to the industry. Effective client relations and telephone courtesy skills are also stressed.

Credits: 3

The first of three courses to introduce and practice the fundamen­tals of animal nursing. Includes animal handling and restraint, patient admission and history, preparation and administration of vaccines and medications, care of hospitalized patients, introduc­tion to radiology, practice management, client relations and sanitation. Limited to Vet Tech students

Credits: 3

This course is a continuation of Animal Nursing I. Covers foundation material in pre- and post-surgical care, surgical assisting, fluid therapy, dental prophylaxis, anesthesiology, and basic nursing skills. Clinic and hospital record keeping are covered with an introduction to practical radiology.

Prerequisites: AGV 161 – Animal Nursing I

Credits: 3

Introduction to veterinary clinical pathology with an emphasis on laboratory procedures commonly performed in private practice. Fecal analysis, basic urinalysis and basic hematology are covered. Proper care and maintenance of laboratory equipment is stressed.

Credits: 3

Basic clinical pathology laboratory procedures including speci­men collection and preservation, hematology, and fecal exam preparation. Hematology will include preparation and performance of PCV, Hb, WBC, RBC counts, preparation and staining blood smears, and performance of differential cell counts. Limited to Vet Tech students.

Prerequisites: AGV 167 – Veterinary Clinic Pathology I

Credits: 3

This course involves the study of pharmacology, application of an­esthetic agents, the physiological effects and means of monitoring them, principles and administration of inhalant anesthetics, and a broad overview of anesthetic protocol and care. Emphasis will be on anesthetic practical skills and anesthesia equipment.

Prerequisites: AGV 161 – Animal Nursing I and AGV 167 – Veterinary Clinic Pathology I

Credits: 4

This course is a continuation of Animal Nursing II. Emphasis is on radiology, dentistry, emergency care, record keeping, anesthesiology and surgical assistance.

Prerequisites: AGV 162 – Animal Nursing II

Credits: 2

Preparation for and observation at a veterinary practice to focus on large animals, including cattle, horses, sheep and swine.

Credits: 3

This course re-introduces the student to computer software com­monly used in veterinary practice. Students will become proficient in the use of Microsoft Office software and software used in the routine management of veterinary records.

Prerequisites: AGV 150 – Office Procedures for Veterinary Technicians

Credits: 4

Refinement of hematology and other skills acquired in Veterinary Clinical Pathology II. Additional units include urinalysis, electro­cardiography, necropsy, cytology, parasitology and specialized clinical procedures.

Prerequisites: AGV 168 – Veterinary Clinic Pathology II

Credits: 2

Preparation for and observation at a veterinary practice to focus on small animals, including cats, dogs and other species as avail­able.

Credits: 1

This course will help students review material from the Veterinary Technician Program and prepare to take the Veterinary Techni­cian National Exam. Emphasis will be placed on the domains of the VTNE.VTNE sample questions will be utilized for student practice.

Prerequisites: AGV 168 – Veterinary Clinic Pathology II, AGV 162 – Animal Nursing II

Credits: 1

Dosage Calculations emphasizes the basic math skills and dos­age calculations required of Veterinary Technicians .Includes pharmaceutical mathematics with an emphasis on dosage calculations and fluid therapy as related to veterinary medicine.

Credits: 4

This course requires an employment experience at a veterinary practice or clinic of at least 320 contact hours. A training sponsor at the employment site will provide supervision, in cooperation with the college instructor. Students will gain hands-on experi­ence and demonstrate knowledge and skills developed in the classroom.

Credits: 3

This course covers the similarities and differences in human societies, from hunting and gathering to industrialized societies. Specific subjects covered include worldview, culture, language, economic systems, marriage, family, and kinship, gender, legal and political structures, religion, and more.

Credits: 3

Introduces art as a visual language, along with the methods and materials used. A brief art survey is also included, with the intent of helping the student become more informed about the visual arts.

Credits: 4

This foundation course focuses on the general knowledge and essential skills used in creating two dimensional designs. Fundamental design concepts including the use of the elements and principles of design, along with color theory, are introduced through a variety of hands-on-experiences.

Credits: 3

A studio-oriented course designed to use the computer as a tool for creating two-dimensional imagery. Technology is now used daily in the world of art including fine arts, graphic arts, and more. Ideally, the student should have access to the all or some of the following programs and peripherals: Microsoft Word, Microsoft Paint, a digital camera or scanner. Other items that could be utilized: Adobe Photoshop, Adobe PageMaker, Adobe Illustrator, printer, and other software appropriate for art and graphic design. In addition, the student should feel comfortable sending images and files via email and the internet.

Credits: 3

Introductory course using electronic media as applied to specific problems in illustration, with an emphasis on creating pathways from hand drawn comprehensives to finished digital output. Vari­ous traditional media are used for references for digitally produced illustrations.

Credits: 3

The course uses a variety of approaches and techniques to develop and enhance the student’s drawing skills. Exploration and experimentation with alternative drawing materials and methods will be strongly encouraged and supported.

Credits: 3

The course is a continuation of ART-133 designed to continue the development and enhancement of the student’s drawing skills.  Further exploration and experimentation with alternative drawing materials and methods will be encouraged.

Prerequisites: ART 133 – Drawing

Credits: 3

The course explores the fundamentals of painting. A variety of painting media will be used including oil, watercolor, and acrylic. Diverse subject matter and approaches to painting will also be explored.

Credits: 3

Continuation of ART 143 with emphasis on a more personal ap­proach regarding technique and imagery.

Prerequisites: ART 143 – Painting

Credits: 3

The course is a studio class providing exploratory experiences in forming, firing, and decorating clay.

Credits: 3

Continuation of Ceramics I with an emphasis on the development of a personal approach to form.

Prerequisites: ART 173 – Ceramics

Credits: 3

Art History I is a survey of art history from the Paleolithic period to the Renaissance period.  General artistic trends from each period and specific styles and innovations will be introduced and compared with the individual cultures and lifestyles of the people(s) involved.

Credits: 3

Introduction to the art of portrait photography.

Prerequisites: JOU 173 – Digital Photography

Credits: 3

Industrial Robotics covers the pertinent subjects to understand­ing how robots work and how they are programmed. It covers the aspects of robot motion and how a robot can be integrated and synchronized with other counterparts in a manufacturing environment.

Prerequisites: ELE 136 – Basic Electricity II

Credits: 3

This course provides the student with an understanding of the concepts, terminology, functionality and applications of motion control. This course will provide the foundation for learning the skills necessary to maintain and program motion control systems. Topics include servo motors, stepper motors, motion controllers, feedback systems and servo-mechanisms.

Prerequisites: ELT 125 – Advanced PLC

Credits: 3

Robotic Programming is a course that will cover the development of robotic applications and common basic programming instruc­tions used in industrial robotic platforms.

Prerequisites: ATR 105 – Industrial Robotics

Credits: 3

The course provides an introduction to the maintenance of automotive systems including tires, batteries, lighting, belts, hoses, filters, and cooling systems.  Information on automotive careers is also introduced.

Credits: 1

The course is designed to prepare the student to work safely in the auto shop. Students will be introduced to safety equipment, safety rules, and common accidents in the automotive service area.

Credits: 3

The course provides instruction on the operation, diagnosis, and repair procedures of the automotive internal combustion engine.

Credits: 3

The course provides experience in the operation, diagnosis, and repair procedures of the automotive braking system.

Credits: 3

The course provides experience in the operation, diagnosis, and repair procedures of the automotive internal combustion engine.

Credits: 4

The course introduces the theory of the operation of transmission hydraulic and mechanical systems.

Credits: 3

This course provides experience in the repair and replacement of transmissions and transaxles.

Credits: 3

The course includes the theory of operation, diagnostic principles, and repair procedures used in the automotive manual transmission, transaxle, and drive train systems.

Credits: 3

The course provides experience in the operation and proper repair of manual transmissions, transaxles, and drive trains used in late model vehicles.

Credits: 3

The course provides instruction on the design, operating principles, service, and alignment procedures of automotive and light truck steering and suspension systems.

Credits: 3

The course includes the operation and service of power and manual steering gears, rack and pinion systems, and suspension systems.  In addition, training on four-wheel alignment and adjustment is covered.

Credits: 2

The course introduces the theory of operation, diagnosis, and repair procedures related to automotive braking systems.

Credits: 3

This course provides knowledge of the fundamentals of electricity along with electrical testing procedures and equipment.

Credits: 3

The course is designed to provide the knowledge and skills necessary to diagnose and repair automotive electrical systems.

Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide the automotive student with the basic knowledge and skills necessary to competently diag­nose and repair the computer controlled systems used in today’s automobile.

Credits: 4

The course is a study of the operation, diagnostics, and of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems used in the automotive industry.

Credits: 4

The course focuses on the operation, diagnosis, and repair procedures used to service automotive ignition systems.

Credits: 4

The course focuses on the diagnostic and repair procedures used to service the automotive fuel system.

Credits: 4

The course focuses on the operation, diagnosis, and repair procedures for electronic engine control systems used in the automotive industry.

Credits: 3

The course provides experience in using critical thinking skills to formulate rapid and accurate diagnoses of automotive drivability systems.

Credits: 4

Automotive Technology on-the-job training (OJT) provides the student with work experience and introduces them to the responsibilities and necessary skills of the modern automotive technician.

Credits: 1

The course prepares students for the careers in the aviation industry.

Credits: 4

The course prepares students for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Private Pilot Knowledge Exam.

Corequisites: AVI 180 – Private Pilot Flight Lab I

Credits: 3

The course prepares students for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Private Pilot Practical Test.

Corequisites: AVI 140 – Private Pilot Ground School

Credits: 4

The course includes ground school instruction in instrument procedures and operations.

Prerequisites: AVI 140 – Private Pilot Ground School

Corequisites: AVI 245 – Instrument Rating Flight Lab

Credits: 3

The course prepares students for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Instrument Rating Practical Test.

Prerequisites: AVI 180 – Private Pilot Flight Lab I

Corequisites: AVI 212 – Instrument Ground School

Credits: 3

The course prepares students for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Instrument Rating Practical Test.

Corequisites: AVI 261 – Commercial Pilot Ground School

Credits: 5

The course prepares students for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Commercial Pilot Practical Test.

Prerequisite: AVI 180 – Private Pilot Flight Lab I

Corequisite: AVI 261 – Commercial Pilot Ground School

Credits: 3

The course prepares students for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Commercial Pilot Knowledge Exam.

Corequisites: AVI 248 – Commercial Pilot Flight Lab

Credits: 3

The course prepares students for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Fundamentals of Instruction Knowledge Exam and Flight Instructor Airplane Knowledge Exam.

Prerequisites: AVI 248 – Commercial Pilot Flight Lab

Corequisites: AVI 350 – Flight Instructor Flight Lab

Credits: 1

The course prepares students for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Instrument Instructor Practical Test.

Credits: 3

The course prepares students for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Flight Instructor Practical Test.

Prerequisites: AVI 248 – Commercial Pilot Flight Lab

Corequisites: AVI 300 – Flight Instructor Ground School

Credits: 1

The course prepares students for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Multi-Engine Instructor Practical Test.

Credits: 3

The course prepares students for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Multi-Engine Rating Practical Test.

Prerequisites
Instr. Commercial Single Engine Pilot Certification.

Credits: 1

This course prepares the student for the FAA Multi-Engine Instructor Add-On rating. The student will take the FAA flight test at completion of the course.

Credits: 1

The course prepares students for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Multi-Engine (Commercial) Rating Practical Test.

Credits: 1

Advanced Flight training in Complex, High Performance, Multi- Engine, or Tail- wheel aircraft.

Credits: 1, 3, 5

The course provides on-the-job training in an aviation position.

Credits: 3

The essentials of word processing and the use of text-editing equipment.

Credits: 3

Provides the student with hands-on training in the use of popular spreadsheet software.

Credits: 3

Introduces web page construction theory along with practical ap­plications. Content includes basic terminology.HTML language and the planning and construction of the student’s own web page.

Credits: 3

In a Windows environment, the focus of this course is to use hardware and software as business productivity tools. Training includes a hands-on introduction to computer applications vital in business and industry .The course covers computer terminol­ogy, operating system, email, and Internet applications .Hands on training is provided for software business applications includ­ing word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation software.

Credits: 3

Provide students with broad understanding of management infor­mation systems in the business environment. Offers more detailed hands-on uses of application programs such as word process­ing, database management and spreadsheets in preparation for careers in business.

Prerequisites: CSC 110 – Intro to Computers and BCA 212 – Intro to Comp Business Apps

Credits: 4

Introduction to all biology, ecology, physiology, and biological prin­ciples. Intended for non-science majors. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 4

Introduction to biology concepts with emphasis on ecology, cellu­lar biology, reproduction and development, genetics and evolution. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 4

Introduction to biology concepts with emphasis on kingdoms; taxonomy and a survey of invertebrate and vertebrate organisms; plant structures and physiology; and animal systems. Lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 112 – General Biology I

Credits: 4

Basic ecology and environmental concepts, including population studies of the world and how they relate to environmental prob­lems. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 3

This course provides the student with the basic background of the nutrients which are essential in maintaining the physical and mental well-being of the human body.  An overview of the digestive processes and the relationship to each group of nutrients is presented.  Basic nutritional principles of food selection are studied with an emphasis on health promotion throughout the life cycle.  Students examine their personal eating habits and identify ways to promote a healthy nutritional status.

Credits: 4

Structure and function of the human body with emphasis on cells, tissues and all major organ systems. Anatomy and physiology are integrated at the cellular level and at the organ/system level. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 4

An advanced study of anatomy and physiology. The relationship between body structure and function and homeostasis forms the basis for the course. Pathological processes that result in dysfunc­tion and disease are presented. Major topics include cell biology, histology, skin, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 4

An advanced study of anatomy and physiology. The relationship between body structure and function and homeostasis forms the basis for the course. Pathological processes that result in dys­function and disease are presented. Major topics include diges­tive, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, immune, blood, metabolism, reproduction, urinary, fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base balance. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 4

General microbiology designed for the science major and nurs­ing students. Emphasis on morphology, physiology, microbial genetics, immunology, pathology, epidemiology, and laboratory techniques. Lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 105 – Introductory Biology, BIO 112 – General Biology I, BIO 163 – Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology, BIO 168 – Human Anatomy & Physiology I,  AGV 118 – Animal Anatomy & Physiology I or higher.

Credits: 3

The basic fundamentals of business. Basic business and economic concepts and terminology; management, marketing, finance, human resource management, accounting and other business areas.

Credits: 2

Students are exposed to areas of retailing through field trips and interaction with people currently in the retail business. The class will involve job seeking skills and include actual job search and interviewing experience.

Credits: 3

A study of the mathematics of business in its application to a va­riety of vocations including fundamental mathematical processes, fractions, price and cost, interest, bank discounts, cash and trade discounts, depreciation, payroll and taxes, and financial statements. Students will acquire the skills to use Microsoft Excel to perform each concept as well as using the traditional methods.

Credits: 2

The course emphasizes correct grammar, punctuation, spelling and tone as applicable to written business communications, let­ters and memos. Included are techniques for writing informational, persuasive, sales, and good and bad news messages.

Credits: 3

Communication skills necessary in the business world, including use of the telephone, interviews, job applications, listening skills and letter writing.

Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to fundamentals of business, including evaluations, typical forms of business, accounting, management styles, marketing and customer service skills. Concepts of business and management functions, organizational considerations, and decision-making processes, are studied.

Credits: 3

This course emphasizes these processes: understanding how to find, analyze and pursue an opportunity; understanding oneself and personality characteristics of the “entrepreneur,” examining the environment for entrepreneurship. A case and experiential approach is used.

Credits: 3

Students are introduced to the basic elements of electronic com­merce as a market where commercial activities are conducted. It will focus on business concepts and how to apply technology in order to be successful. Topics include market trends, globalizing a company, vendor solutions, storefronts, advertising, resource requirements, and operational issues of launching a commercial presence in today’s global electronic marketplace.

Credits: 2

Students are given the opportunity to apply human relations concepts and evaluate experience and observations. Social skills required in various occupational settings will be developed, emphasizing how appropriate personal attitudes lead to social and business success.

Credits: 3

Students are given the opportunity to apply human relations concepts and evaluate experience and observations. Social skills required in various occupational settings will be developed, emphasizing how appropriate personal attitudes lead to social and business success.

Credits: 1

Introduces business and accounting students to career opportuni­ties in the business world. The course includes methods of net­working and the processes needed to successfully begin a career.

Credits: 3

Business Law 1 is an introduction to Business Law in the areas of legal environment of business, contract law, contracts for the sale of goods (UCC) and real and personal property law.

Credits: 3

A continuation of BUS 185 in the area of sales, principal agent relationships, commercial paper, creditor rights, and secured transactions, real property, and bailments, as time permits.

Prerequisites: BUS 185 – Business Law

Credits: 3

This course explores leadership styles effective in the workplace and helps participants gain insight into their natural leadership style and implications of that style on work and group perfor­mance.

Credits: 4

This course provides a foundation of statistical concepts and pro­cedures that can aid the student as both a consumer and produc­er of statistical information. The course emphasizes descriptive and inferential statistical methods, probability, estimation, hypoth­esis testing and linear regression. Students are also introduced to software as it applies to introductory statistical methods.

Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score

Credits: 3

A continuation of BUS 211 or MAT 157. Application of statistics in a business context and use of computer software for statistics.

Prerequisites: BUS 211 – Business Statistics or MAT 157 – Statistics

Credits: 3

Fundamental principles of real estate evaluation, brokerage, financing structure, construction and real estate law.

Credits: 3-5

To give the student hands on experience in a business related occupation and to apply what they have learned in class to real life situation. It also will introduce them to some business activities that will be or have been covered in class.

Credits: 5

Apprenticeship in office systems. Students will work as regular employees in offices supervised by staff members.

Credits: 3

Thirty-two students from the University of Iowa, University of Northern Iowa, Iowa State University, Buena Vista University and Iowa Lakes Community College will participate in an advanced study of entrepreneurship including a team-based entrepreneurial venture computer simulation, seminars with successful entre­preneurs, business and community leaders, and networking and mentoring to enhance students’ understanding of entrepreneur­ship opportunities in Iowa.

Credits: 4

The first of two general survey courses introducing the student to general, organic and biological chemistry. Topics covered are chemical calculations, atomic structure, nuclear chemistry, periodic relations, gas laws, solid state, solutions, and acids and bases. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 4

Continuation of CHM 151. Covers kinetics and equilibrium of chemical reactions as well as acid-base theory. Hydrocarbon naming and reactions are also covered, including alcohols, car­bohydrates, amines, acids, acid derivatives, lipids, amino acids, nucleic acids and proteins, SNA, RNA and metabolism. Lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHM 151 – College Chemistry I

Credits: 5

The properties of matter in terms of modern chemical principles. The topics covered are measurements, stoichiometry, atomic structure, chemical reactions, periodic relationships, gas laws, thermochemistry, quantum theory, solutions and equilibrium and inter-and intra-molecular forces. Problem solving in each of the areas is included. Lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisites: High school chemistry and mathematics

Credits: 5

This course is an introduction to organic chemistry, and covers: acids and bases, oxidation/reduction, solubility products, and nuclear chemistry, kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, coordination complexes, qualitative analysis. Problem solving in each of the areas is included. Microscale and semi-microscale labs are also included.

Prerequisites: CHM 166 – General Chemistry I

Credits: 4

This course covers the basics of chemistry as it relates to the forensic lab. In the course we will cover the basics of evidence collection, clues at the atomic level, and the basics of chemical evidence including DNA evidence. Also covered will be the use of chemistry in explosives, arson investigations, poisoning, and estimating time of death of a victim. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 5

This is part of a yearlong rigorous survey of Organic Chemistry. Modern Organic Chemistry, including nomenclature, syntheses, structure, bonding, mechanisms and carbon and its compounds. This course is for students majoring in pre-medicine, pre-veter­inary medicine, chemistry, biological sciences, and for anyone planning to take further courses in chemistry. Lecture and Laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHM 176 – General Chemistry II

Credits: 5

This course is a continuation of CHM 263 .  This is part of a yearlong rigorous survey of Organic Chemistry. Classes of organic compounds studied will be aldehydes, ketones, acids, and acid derivatives, amines and nitrogen derived compounds. Aromatic compounds, reactions, mechanisms, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, and proteins are covered. Lecture & laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHM 263 – Organic Chemistry I

Credits: 3

Studies the most commonly used structured techniques of flow charting included with the concept of data flow in large integrated systems. Also included are systems design, systems analysis and systems development for data processing solutions.

Credits: 3

Introduction to the concepts of computer programming and Graphical User Interfaces.  Includes structured design techniques for modern problem solving.

Credits: 4

This course is a continuation of program design and analysis for students with some prior programming experience.  It is designed to expand students’ knowledge of computer science and sharpen their programming skills. Topics to be covered include an overview of fundamental programming concepts as well as object oriented programming techniques, classes, inheritance, graphical user interfaced, layout managers and event, exception handlers, and database connectivity.

Prerequisites: CIS 141 – Computer Science

Credits: 3

This course will introduce students to all aspects of the game development process. The course will begin with a brief history of the gaming industry and then delve into the specific design phases. Emphasis will be placed on the development of the design document and evaluating real world examples. Character design and storyboarding will be discussed as well as gaming genres and gaming consoles.

Credits: 3

This course will give students a hands on, example based intro­duction to the level design process for use in 3D games. Students will learn to use industry standard design programs and will understand basic lighting, texturing, NPC (non player character) and object placement as well as level layout concepts. Students will critique professional and peer designed levels through play testing and critical analysis.

Credits: 3

This course will give students a hands-on, example based intro­duction to the modeling and animation process for use in movies or games. Colors, textures, physical simulations, and keyframe based animation are covered.

Credits: 3

Structured language which is powerful, efficient and versatile. The student can write programs from very simple applications to advanced editors, operating systems and sophisticated applica­tion programs.

Credits: 3

The goal of this course is to give students advanced exposure to the C++ programming language as it pertains to game develop­ment. C++ is considered the standard language in the field and this course will provide hands-on examples coupled with theory that applies directly to gaming. Topics covered include basic programming constructs, object oriented programming, refer­ences and pointers, the standard template library, functions, and dynamic memory allocation. Advanced concepts include data structures and algorithms directly relevant to game programming.

Credits: 3

Introduces basic Java language concepts by building applications and applets. Students will build graphic user interfaces using the Abstract Windowing Toolkit. Advanced Java concepts will be discussed.

Prerequisites: CIS 141 – Computer Science and CIS 125 – Intro to Programming Logic W/Language

Credits: 3

This course will give students the opportunity to explore web de­velopment concepts without the aid of design products like Adobe Dreamweaver. This course will begin with a brief history of the technological constructs of the Internet followed by an in depth, hands on approach to XHTML, CSS along with basic JavaScript. Concepts will include XHTML Documents Type Descriptions, basic formatting, hyperlinks, handling graphics and XHTML events, and various XHTML tags. JavaScript concepts will include: The Document Object Model, variables, statements, loops, decisions and program logic. Students will be exposed to the new tags and properties of HTML5 and CSS3.

Credits: 3

This course provides students with a foundation in the design, implementation and management of database systems. This course will provide an illustration of the physical and logical representation of data using theory and practice. The concepts of Data Modeling, Normalization and the SQL language will be explored in depth followed by actual implementation in case studies and class projects. The students will also discuss the role of database technology in modern industry. The students will utilize the open source MySQL database for all in-class examples and projects.

Credits: 3

This course exposes students to 2-dimensional game develop­ment concepts using the Torque2D game engine. Students will learn concepts related to 2d game development and then apply what they learn to a variety of scenarios through examples and tutorials. The culmination of this course involves creating a fully functional 2d game. Topics include: introduction to the Torque2D software, level editing, sprites (animated and static), networking, behaviors, scripting, basic physics, GUI development, and sound.

Prerequisites: CIS 141 – Computer Science

Credits: 3

This project-based, portfolio building course expands the concepts introduced in Game Development I. There will be more empha­sis on C++ code editing, under the hood, of the game engine of choice.

Prerequisites: CIS 366 – Game Development I, CIS 125 – Intro to Programming Logic W/Language

Credits: 3

This course expands upon concepts of computer programming knowledge gained from Computer Science I (CIS 141), pre­senting modern structured design and techniques using Visual BASIC programming language, as well as gaining some insight to industry database programming with a brief introduction to Object Orientated Programming.

Credits: 3, 5

Students will gain practical experience at individual work stations and will be required to report on their field experience. Evaluations will be based on their on-site performance.

Credits: 3

Developing skills in reading, writing and listening as they apply to students’ vocational needs.

Credits: 2

Refining of skills in reading, writing and listening as they apply to the student’s vocational needs.

Credits: 3

This course is designed to prepare students for the oral and writ­ten communication situations in the working world. The major ar­eas of study include technical communication principles, oral com­munications, composing technical documents, and using Standard English. Writing projects require the use of a word processing program; therefore, computer experience is recommended.

Credits: 3

This course focuses on composition and editing of curriculum-specific technical and business-related writing projects. Instruc­tion includes formatting, information gathering, document drafting, editing, and written employment strategies.

Credits: 1

Welding techniques applicable to the construction trade.

Credits: 2

Studies the builders’ visual language and communication.

Credits: 1

Estimating techniques used at the lumber desk at a retail estab­lishment.

Credits: 3

Construction Estimation II is an extension of the concepts learned in the first year in Construction Estimation. Pro­cesses learned in the first year class will be implemented and put into practice. Industry professionals will present different methods they use along with computerized esti­mation programs. Students will develop different estima­tion sheets for a specific task and implement into practice.

Credits: 5

This course is designed to have the student work with site prep, plan and on-site building layout, and foundation work along with basement bearing partitions. Also included will be interior and ex­terior concrete. The student will study slab-on-grade foundations, poured and block foundations, and permanent pressure-treated foundations. Estimating foundation and concrete materials will be covered.

Credits: 1

This course provides detailed training on structural insulated panels (SIPs).It covers every aspect from design to installation to selling SIPs, and provides not only the “how-to” but the “why it works.”

Credits: 2

Basic framing techniques with emphasis on identification and ap­plication. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 3

Exterior finish work on residential and commercial structures. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 4

This course covers the framing of a structure including floor sys­tems, exterior and interior bearing/non bearing walls, stairways, roof systems, exterior fascia and soffit framing along with exterior sheathing.

Credits: 3

Covers interior finishing material and its installation in residential and commercial structures. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 3

Covers interior wall coverings and their application as well as thermal and sound insulation. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 4

This course is a study of the products used in the exterior cover­ing of a residential project including various types and styles of roofing materials, siding and exterior wall coverings, soffit and fascia materials, flashings, trim and moldings, exterior fasteners, caulks and sealants, and paints and preservations.

Credits: 1

This course describes and explains advanced framing techniques that are used in high energy efficient framing in residential hous­ing construction. Students will explore and apply ways to frame and finish framing systems that save energy but using proven techniques. Students will also go to current building projects and critique framing methods being used on site.

Credits: 3

This course is an overview of basic computer aided residential construction drafting and design. It explores concepts, issues and methods in computer-aided design. Emphasis is placed on the creation of two-dimensional as well as three-dimensional models using the design program.

Credits: 6

On-the-job training to gain experience in the student’s field of interest.

Credits: 3

The Construction Internship II provides on the job training for area of student interest. This course will have a manager’s or super­visor’s emphasis with job shadowing and leadership skills the main focus. Students will be required to document their time and discuss with instructor during scheduled meetings.

Credits: 6

This first course, also known as basic training, is required before advancement in Cosmetology. This course is designed to introduce and develop an understanding of the various realms of cosmetology. Students will develop skills relating to haircutting, haircoloring, hairstyling, nail techniques, and personal growth. Students will cultivate their passions within the field of cosmetology.

Credits: 5

Theory II continues to build student knowledge and abilities in the salon. Students will develop skills relating to haircutting, hair coloring, hairstyling, nail techniques, facials, and makeup application. Students will also engage with clients, developing the necessary skills to be a successful cosmetologist.

Credits: 6

This is the second practicum in Cosmetology. Students will practice skills in haircutting, haircoloring, hairstyling, nail techniques, sanitation, and facials. Students will cultivate their passion within the field of cosmetology. Students will also engage with clients, developing the necessary skills to be a successful cosmetologist.

Credits: 6

Skills IV continues to build student abilities in the salon.  Students will practice skills relating to haircutting, haircoloring, hairstyling, nail techniques, facials, and makeup application.  Students will also engage with clients, developing the necessary skills to be a successful cosmetologist.

Prerequisites: COS 130 –  Cosmetology Theory III & COS 172 – Practical Cosmetology Skills III

Corequisite: COS 131 – Cosmetology Theory IV

Credits: 5

Cosmetology Theory III continues to build student knowledge of salon services, the scope of practice, proper sanitation procedures, and salon management.

Prerequisite: COS 117 – Cosmetology Theory II

Credits: 4

Theory IV continues to build student knowledge and abilities in the salon.  Students will master theory concepts relating to haircutting, haircoloring, hairstyling, nail techniques, facials, and makeup application.  Students will also learn to engage with clients, developing the necessary knowledge to be a successful cosmetologist.

Prerequisites: COS 130 –  Cosmetology Theory III & COS 172 – Practical Cosmetology Skills III

Corequisite: COS 120 – Applied Cosmetology Skills IV

Credits: 3
Credits: 6

This first practicum in cosmetology is required before advancement in the program.  The student will demonstrate proper hygiene, good grooming, sanitation techniques, and basic cosmetology procedures.  Protection of the student and public are emphasized.

Corequisites: COS 110 – Basic Principles in Cosmetology

Credits: 6

Practical Cosmetology Skills III continues to provide student practice with salon services, the scope of practice, proper sanitation procedures, and salon management.

Prerequisite: COS 118 – Applied Cosmetology Skills II

Credits: 6

Provides knowledge and an understanding of basic business principles designed for the cosmetology profession. It continues to build on previous practical skills needed to be a successful cosmetologist.

Credits: 2

An overview of all previous classes required and successfully completed. Preparation for state board examination and for becoming a successful cosmetologist.

Credits: 2

This preceptorship provides a student additional development in a professional salon under the supervision and guidance of a practicing licensed cosmetologist.  Hands-on business learning, client relationships, and salon procedures are a few exciting aspects within a positive functioning salon.

Prerequisites: COS 130 –  Cosmetology Theory III & COS 172 – Practical Cosmetology Skills III

Corequisites: COS 120 – Applied Cosmetology Skills IV & COS 131 – Cosmetology Theory IV

Credits: 3

Survey of the American criminal justice system, the early, middle and late stages of the criminal justice system are analyzed within the framework of law and research.

Credits: 3

Through study of various models of ethics, students will learn how to evaluate difficult moral and ethical decisions they are likely to face as a practitioner in the law enforcement or corrections field.

Credits: 3

Broad examination of the various structures and functions of American Law Enforcement agencies and their functional units. The exploration of police procedures revolves around the topics of discretion, effectiveness and efficiency, and constitutional limits.

Credits: 3

Survey of correctional theory and practice including such topics as: historical foundations of contemporary corrections, applied theory, evaluation research, sentencing and crime prevention.

Credits: 1

This course provides the student with the opportu­nity to become engaged in a community service project.

Credits: 3

This course examines the elements of criminal law. Including the categories of crime by type, defenses, and individuals involved. The course also includes the historical development of criminal law.

Prerequisites: CRJ 100 – Intro to Criminal Justice

Credits: 3

This course examines the protections afforded to individuals by the US Constitution. Specific areas addressed include initial con­tact with law enforcement and continues through post-conviction relief. Students should gain an understanding of criminal proce­dures through statutory and precedent case review.

Prerequisites: CRJ 100 – Intro to Criminal Justice and CRJ 130 – Criminal Law

Credits: 3

Examines the law in the correctional setting with obligations of correctional workers.

Prerequisites: CRJ 120 – Intro to Corrections

Credits: 3

Covers fundamentals of investigation including interviewing and interrogating; collecting and preserving evidence; modus ope­randi; crime scene search; etc.

Credits: 3

This course identifies and discusses the nature of the success­ful cyber-crime investigation and the proper preparation for trial. Students will have a better understanding of current technology used in these crimes.

Credits: 3

Scientific study of the nature and causes of criminal behavior and social deviance.

Credits: 3

Juvenile justice system is examined from historical constitutional and operational perspectives. Theories concerning juvenile delin­quency are explored.

Credits: 3

Designed to help the student understand sociological aspects of drug use, abuse and treatment.

Credits: 3

This course will introduce the student to the private security pro­fession in America and current trends in the industry.

Credits: 2

This program is designed to provide non-Spanish-speaking criminal justice students and police officers with functional skills in Spanish. Spanish phrases, commands, and questions practical to daily police and corrections work are covered. No prior knowledge of Spanish necessary.

Credits: 2

This course is designed to provide preparation to students for on-the-job experience in a criminal justice related field. The student will also learn certain requirements within the criminal justice profession. This class prepares you for Field Experience II, student internship.

Prerequisites: CRJ 100 – Intro to Criminal Justice

Credits: 3

Continuation of CRJ 218 Field Experience I. This is an internship course. Speak with instructor or see syllabus for prerequisites.

Prerequisites: CRJ 218 – Field Experience I

Credits: 3

Presents the theoretical and philosophical basis of probation, parole and other community based correctional programs.

Credits: 1

Introduction to police firearms safety and care; use of deadly force; chemical agents; firing range safety; latest techniques of combat shooting; and recreational shooting.

Credits: 1

Supplemental enrichment course related to Criminal Justice which may include special projects or papers.

Credits: 1

Supplemental enrichment course related to Criminal Justice which includes special projects; projects may include tours, Ride-Along, question and answer sessions with professionals and others af­fected by the criminal justice field.

Credits: 5

Course for students who wish to take all their experience at one time.

Credits: 2

Students receive instruction and perform all types of plastic and adhesive repair as well as SMC repair. Course is achieved through industry demos, and hands on plastic repairs.

Credits: 2

Shop and tool safety, tool and equipment usage and career op­tions in the collision repair industry are studied. Vehicle construc­tion and components are introduced and environmental effects and proper safety, handling and disposal of hazardous materials used in collision repair are studied.

Credits: 3

Metalworking skills are emphasized as the foundation of properly repairing damaged metal panels, followed by an understanding of body fillers and shaping techniques. Damage theory is covered in addition to damage analysis and the different types of steel used in automotive construction. Introduction and paint gun use for conversion coatings and primer will be covered.

Credits: 2

Metalworking skills are performed by properly repairing dam­aged metal panels, followed by using body fillers and shaping techniques. Damage analysis and repairing steel panels used in automotive construction are worked with first hand. Introduction and paint gun use for applying conversion coatings and primer will also be covered.

Credits: 2

Collision Lab I provides an actual shop setting where project vehicles are worked on based off of actual estimates generated by the student.  The objective of this lab is to fine tune previously taught skills and to sequence a repair plan while improving speed and working efficiently on a production basis.

Credits: 2

Students repair vehicles in the lab based on actual estimates gen­erated by the students. Skills are fine-tuned to sequence a repair plan while improving speed and working efficiently on a production basis.

Prerequisites: CRR 351 – Collision Lab I

Credits: 3

Panel replacement and alignment of doors, hoods, etc. are studied. Course also covers theories of door hardware, window systems, and exterior and interior trim replacement and repairs.

Credits: 2

Panel replacement and alignment of doors, hoods, etc. are practiced. Door hardware, window systems, and exterior and interior trim replacement and repairs and performed on actual vehicles.

Credits: 3

The basic fundamentals of frame diagnosis and repair on conven­tional and unitized frames are taught. Also, the types of frame machines and safety are introduced, as well as collision theory. Structural integrity via stationary glass is covered along with its replacement. Includes replacement of structural panels, including both new and used parts. Sectioning techniques are introduced as well as a study in sideswipe, frontal, and rear damages as well as rollover damages.

Credits: 2

Frame diagnosis and repair on conventional and unitized frames are performed on vehicles. Frame machines, as well as structural integrity via stationary glass is covered along with its replacement. Includes replacement of structural panels including both new and used parts. Sectioning techniques are introduced as well as a study in sideswipe, frontal, and rear damages as well as rollover damages. All above work is performed on actual vehicles.

Credits: 2

Accident damaged mechanical components are covered in this course. Basic repairs to electrical, suspension, steering, cooking and air conditioning systems are taught, beginning with diagnosis and an understanding of identification and system operations.

Credits: 1

Basic repairs to electrical, suspension, steering, cooling and air conditioning systems are performed beginning with identification of damaged parts and replacement.

Credits: 2

Analyzing and learning to write a cost estimate using a computer as well as printed material. Knowledge of parts, manuals, no­menclature and flat rate charts is covered and shop management techniques are introduced.

Credits: 1

Practice in analyzing a job and writing an estimate using a com­puter as well as printed material. Shop management skills and professionalism are demonstrated.

Corequisites: CRR 742 – Estimating Theory

Credits: 1

Introduction to painting including surface preparation, safety, composition of paint, primers and sealers, application techniques and equipment.

Credits: 3

Practice in surface preparation, safety, application techniques for paints, primers and sealers. Masking skills and paint application are performed. Correcting paint imperfections is practiced along with application of decals and stripes.

Corequisites: CRR 808 – Introduction to Refinishing Theory

Credits: 2

Theory of adjusting tints for a color match, blending techniques, tri-coat finishes to achieve finishes on today’s vehicles. Color the­ory and techniques for applying pearls and metallics are studied.

Credits: 3

Practice in adjusting tints for a color match, blending and spraying tri-coat finishes and applying pearls, metallics and custom paints.

Prerequisites: CRR 809 – Introduction to Refinishing Lab

Corequisites: CRR 838 – Refinishing II Theory

Credits: 2

Job training in a collision repair facility performing assigned tasks.

Prerequisites: First two semesters of program

Credits: 3

CSC-110 is an introductory course that surveys a variety of topics to include history, hardware, software, terminology, com­munications, computer ethics, and societal impact of computers. In addition to computer literacy, students will complete hands-on modules using operating systems, word processing, database, presentation, and spreadsheet software; such as Microsoft Office programs.

Credits: 3

This course presents the basic concepts of information systems and computer literacy. The course incorporates theory as well as hands-on practice which focuses on spreadsheets and database management systems (DBMS).

Credits: 3

Introduces drama as a separate literary form as approached his­torically from Greek drama to the present, including both classic and contemporary drama.

Credits: 3

Introduction to the human services and helping professions. A basic overview of services available, recipient populations and is­sues related to helping others. Covers professionalism, teamwork and communication skills.

Credits: 3

Students will develop the beginning skills of observing and man­aging the behavior of others individually or in groups. This course introduces students to beginning behavior teaching methods and situations. Teaches how-to skills, such as observing, recording, designing, implementing and evaluating behavior programs.

Credits: 4

Focus is on available support services and vocational aspects of rehabilitation. Content includes identification of job tasks, occu­pational characteristics and job matching. Students gain under­standing of the need for services and the referral process. Job analysis and labor market surveys are completed. Students will develop an appreciation of the psychosocial adjustment aspects of living with a disability. This course will cover both physical and mental disabilities and services available. Students will participate with Service Learning projects.

Credits: 4

This is an introductory course in applied counseling techniques. Students are introduced to a variety of facilitative skills and counseling concepts and work through the interviewing process in simulated helping services settings.

Credits: 2, 3

Practical field experience in phases of operation and duties relat­ing to human services, paraeducation, health or rehabilitation. Focus is program writing, data collection, documentation, job skills, and participant outcome.

Credits: 3, 4, 6

Practical field experience in phases of operation and duties relat­ing to human services, paraeducation, health or rehabilitation. Focus is program writing, data collection, documentation, job skills, and participant outcome.

Credits: 3

Gives students a historical and philosophical foundation of the field of early childhood education. Includes an overview of assess­ment and trends that influence best practices. Explores careers in the field. Addresses influences of families and diversity.

Credits: 1

Assists the eligible CDA credential candidate with developing and preparing for the Preschool, Infant-Toddler, or Family Child Care CDA validation visit and assessment.

Prerequisites: ECE 103 – Intro to Early Childhood Ed, ECE 133 – Child Health, Safety, and Nutrition, and ECE 243 – Early Childhood Guidance

Credits: 1

Emphasizes problem solving skills and team building through a variety of group activities.

Prerequisites: Enrollment in Early Childhood Education program

Credits: 1

Emphasizes human relations skills including communication, leadership, personal appearance, etiquette and job seeking skills.

Prerequisites: ECE 110 – Early Childhood Professionals I

Credits: 1

Guides students’ development of a professional early childhood education portfolio showcasing their knowledge, skills, and dispositions in alignment with the NAEYC Standards for Professional Preparation of Students at the Associate Degree Level.

Credits: 1

Guides students’ completion and presentation of a professional early childhood education portfolio showcasing their knowledge, skills, and dispositions in alignment with the NAEYC Standards for Professional Preparation of Students at the Associate Degree Level.

Prerequisites: ECE 112 – Portfolio Development I

Credits: 3

Focuses on current concepts in the fields of health, safety and nutrition and their relationship to the growth and development of the young child ages birth to eight. Blends current theory with practical applications and assessments. Includes the influences of families and diversity on health, safety, and nutrition in early child­hood settings.

Credits: 3

Examines and evaluates early childhood curriculum and methods leading to the development and implementation of appropriate curricula for young children.

Credits: 3

Focuses on the development, implementation and assessment of appropriate environments and curricula for young children ages three through eight. Students prepare to utilize developmentally appropriate practices in a context of family and culturally sensi­tive care. Emphasis is on understanding children’s developmental stages and developing appropriate learning opportunities, interactions and environments in the following areas: dramatic play, art, music, fine and gross motor play.

Credits: 3

Focuses on the development, implementation and assessment of appropriate environments and curricula for young children ages three through eight. Students prepare to utilize developmentally appropriate practices in a context of family and culturally sensi­tive care. Emphasis is on understanding children’s developmental stages and developing appropriate learning opportunities, interac­tions and environments in the following areas: emergent literacy, math, science, technology and social studies.

Credits: 3

Reviews typical and atypical development of children from con­ception to adolescence in all developmental domains. Presents interactions between child, family and society within a variety of community and cultural contexts. Examines theories associated with our understanding of children.

Credits: 1

This course emphasizes problem solving skills and teambuilding through a variety of group activities.

Prerequisites: ECE 111 – Early Childhood Professionals II

Credits: 3

Focuses on care, education, and assessment of children from birth to thirty-six months. Prepares students to utilize develop­mentally appropriate practices including responsive caregiving, routines as curriculum, importance of relationships with diverse families, and a focus on the whole child in inclusive settings.

Credits: 3

Focuses on developmentally appropriate, evidence-based approaches and positive guidance strategies for supporting the development of each child. Emphasizes supportive interactions and developmentally appropriate environments. Uses assessment to analyze and guide behaviors. Studies impact of family, and each child’s culture, language and ability on child guidance.

Credits: 3

An in-depth study of current political, economic, social and cultural events and their impact on children and child care.

Credits: 3

Supervised experience in selected early childhood settings serving children ages birth through eight. Includes integration of theory, research, and reflective practice. Provides an understanding of developmentally appropriate practices and the developmental stages of diverse populations of young children and families. Emphasizes professional relationships and behavior, appropriate adult / child interactions, basic curriculum planning, and program routines.

Prerequisites: ECE 170 – Child Growth and Development

Corequisites: ECE 158 – Early Childhood Curriculum I and ECE 159 – Early Childhood Curriculum II

Credits: 3

This a supervised experience of at least 80 contact hours in a selected early childhood settings serving children ages birth through eight.

Prerequisites: ECE 210 – Early Childhood Prof III and ECE 262 – Early Childhood Field Experience

Credits: 3

Covers the basic principles involved in setting up, equipping and administering a child care center .Emphasis is on business procedures, insurance, funding, state and federal regulations, staff and community relations, record keeping, policy writing, program evaluation and child care advocacy.

Credits: 3

Reviews national income and output; employment and prices; money and credit; government finance; monetary and fiscal policy; economic growth and development; and international finance.

Credits: 3

Reviews the organization and workings of modern economic sys­tems; the role of markets, prices and competition in the promotion of economic welfare, alternative systems and international trade.

Credits: 3

An introduction to professional education providing a historical and philosophical background from which the student can exam­ine his or her commitment to education. Challenges and issues in education today will be discussed in the context of school or­ganization, funding, curriculum, professionalism, legal issues and effective teacher characteristics.

Credits: 3

An introduction to professional education providing a historical and philosophical background from which the student can exam­ine his or her own commitment to education. Challenges and is­sues in education today will be discussed in the context of school organization, funding, curriculum, professionalism, legal issues and effective teacher characteristics.

Credits: 1

Students will complete 40 hours of observation and assistance in a K-12 setting.

Credits: 3

Teaches the criteria for choosing the best children’s literature and applies that criteria to evaluating materials to be used in the classroom.

Credits: 3

This course helps students explore the different areas of engi­neering and engineering technology. This course gives students a basic understanding of how to create and read engineering drawings. This course will also prepare students, using sketching, to extend perceptual and visualization skills which in turn will later serve the student in producing CAD drawings and in the design process.

Credits: 3

This course will introduce students to the basic principles and components of fluid power systems including hydraulics and pneumatics. Students will also learn how to read fluid power sche­matics and troubleshoot basic systems.

Credits: 3

This course will introduce students to the basic structure and application of hydraulics. Students will also learn how to read hy­draulic schematics and troubleshoot basic hydraulic components.

Credits: 2

This course covers fluid power electrical controls such as sole­noids, programmable controls and servo controls. Troubleshooting and maintenance of servo valves and proportional control valves as well as other fluid power components are covered.

Prerequisites: EGT 138 – Intro to Fluid Power and ELT 125 – Advanced PLC

Credits: 4

Students will complete job contact experience in their field of choice. A minimum of 288 job contact hours is required by this 4-credit course.

Credits: 6

Students will complete job contact experience in their field of choice. A minimum of 432 job contact hours is required by this 6-credit course.

Credits: 4

Electrical Theory I is an introduction to basic electrical theory and components that make up electrical circuits. Direct Current and Alternating Current will be introduced and basic laws for voltage, current and power relationships will be presented in lecture and laboratory format. Course content will include, but not be limited to basic circuits, electrical components and their applications. Hands-on reinforcement of theory covered during lecture is prac­ticed in lab.

Credits: 4

Electric Theory II consists of instruction that will build upon experi­ence gained in Electric Theory I. Students will be introduced to advanced concepts of electrical theory.

Credits: 2

An introduction to the NFPA 70® National Electrical Code®. The course covers Chapters 1 and 2 of the Code, including the struc­ture of the Code, requirements of electricians, and basic wiring and protection.

Credits: 2

A continuation of the NFPA 70® National Electrical Code®. The course covers Chapters 3 and 4 of the Code, including wiring methods, materials, and general equipment.

Prerequisites: ELE 155 – NEC I

Credits: 2

A continuation of the NFPA 70® National Electrical Code®. The course covers Chapters 5 and 6 of the Code, including special occupancies and equipment.

Prerequisites: ELE 156 – NEC II

Credits: 4

This course is designed to introduce students to residential wiring. Discussion topics will include safety, planning, using residential building plans, calculating loads, and wiring methods. Lab settings will require the student to use hand tools and wire circuits. The National Electrical Code will be used in depth to determine the requirements used for residential wiring. We will be using hand and power tools in the labs for wiring practices and installations.

Credits: 4

Electrical Practical Applications will provide students with practical wiring exercises involving installation, wiring, and troubleshoot­ing of electrical devices and equipment used in, but not specific to, wind turbine control systems. Students will study electrical diagrams, design of electrical systems, and electrical safety.

Prerequisites: ELE 226 – Electric Motors & Generators

Credits: 3

This course discusses motor controls, components, operation, and service. Students will learn electric relay control of AC and DC motors along with troubleshooting motors in an industrial application.

Credits: 4

Electric motors & generators is an introduction to types of motors and generators that are used today. The characteristics of Direct Current and Alternating Current motors and generators will be dis­cussed and demonstrated through lecture and hands on labora­tory sessions.

Prerequisites: ELE 119 – Basic Electricity I

Credits: 2

An introduction of the NFPA 70E® Electrical Safety in the Work­place and NFPA 70B® Recommended Practice for Electrical Equipment Maintenance documents. Technicians are required to do preventive maintenance on electrical equipment and to do it safely. These documents will be used to discuss how this is to be accomplished in the workplace.

Credits: 4

Introduce students to Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC’s), primarily the Siemens S7-200 processors, the Siemens LOGO smart relay processor and the Bachmann M1 Controllers. The course will provide students with experiences in the following: Numbering systems associated with programming and addressing PLC’s Hardware and software familiarization associ­ated with PLC’s Using programming instruction sets to create and edit ladderlogic programs Troubleshooting techniques using a PLCTroubleshooting techniques using a schematic and drawings

Credits: 2

A completion and review of the NFPA 70® National Electrical Code®. The course covers Chapters 7, 8, and 9 of the Code, including special conditions, communications systems, and ap­plicable tables to the Code.

Prerequisites: ELE 158 – NEC III

Credits: 3

This course introduces students to commercial wiring. It begins with the planning of the commercial installation by using blue­prints, layout, and calculations. They will be required to calculate load for branch circuits, feeders and the electrical service. Wiring methods, luminaires, motors and overcurrent protection will also be covered. The National Electrical Code requirements will be used and explained to understand how they are applied to com­mercial installations. The labs will consist of bending conduit and use hand tools for wiring methods and practices.

Prerequisites: ELE 181 – Residential Electric/Electronics Systems

Credits: 3

This class will deal with the wiring aspects and electrical compo­nents of industrial installations. Modern industrial plants require technicians to be knowledgeable in high voltage, medium voltage, and low voltage systems. Systems from the substation, overcur­rent protection, conductors, capacitors, and power quality will be discussed. Wiring methods and practices for hazardous locations will be taught in the class also.

Prerequisites: ELE 354 – Commercial Electric/Electronics Systems

Credits: 6

Students will complete their internship (practicum) through job contact experience to improve their readiness to enter their chosen field and focus them on the advanced training in their second year prior to graduation. A minimum 3-page, APA format­ted synopsis of their experience is required upon completion of the internship.

Credits: 3

This course will introduce students to advanced programming commands through industrial applications. Concepts include sequencers, file moves, arithmetic functions and data communica­tions from different PLC platforms.

Prerequisites: ELE 242 – Programmable Logic Control Systems

Credits: 3

This course provides students with knowledge and understand­ing of digital logic circuit design and operation using integrated circuits. Studies include combinatorial logic circuits, flip-flops, arithmetic circuits, counters and registers, memory devices and logic families.

Prerequisites: ELE 119 – Basic Electricity I

Credits: 4

Foundational training in local area networking technology, pro­tocols and installation procedures. Introduction to supervisory control and data acquisition for industrial networks.

Prerequisites: ELT 732 – Introduction to Industrial Instrumentation

Credits: 3

Comprehensive introduction to components, circuits, instruments and control techniques used in industrial systems.

Prerequisites: ELE 136 – Basic Electricity II

Credits: 1

Basic writing course designed for students in certificate programs.

Credits: 2

Individualized course in general grammar review including usage and punctuation.

Credits: 3

Developmental writing course designed to prepare students for college level writing. This course includes a general grammar review and prewriting strategies. Different types of paragraphs and essay writing is covered.

Credits: 2

This course will prepare students for college level writing.

Credits: 3

Emphasis on expository and argumentative writings including a review of usage and mechanics.

Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on the ACT, Accuplacer, ASSET,COMPASS as determined by Iowa Lakes policy

Credits: 3

Continuation of ENG 105 with emphasis on research and docu­mentation as well as literary analysis.

Prerequisites: ENG 105 – Composition I

Credits: 3

Processes and methods of creating poetry and fiction. Reading the work of professional writers and applying various techniques of imaginative writing through workshops, discussion and indi­vidual conferences.

Credits: 4

This course examines the ecological principles used in the preservation of biological diversity. Some topics explored are population dynamics, conservation genetics, island biogeogra­phy, mathematical modeling of ecological systems, disturbance ecology, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), reserve theory and wildlife corridors. Labs will involve field work, data analysis, computer work and research.

Credits: 4

Environmental Studies I is an introduction to ecology and environ­mental science. This course acquaints the student with the rela­tionship between humans and their environment and the environ­mental problems that often develop because of this relationship. Topics covered include concepts of ecology, population dynamics, human ecology and environmental law. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 4

Environmental Studies II is an introduction to the study of global resources management and the analysis and control of environ­mental pollution. This course acquaints the student with the fun­damentals of resource management and the physical, chemical, and biological analysis of pollutants that contaminate the Earth’s biosphere. Topics covered include global resources, resource management, environmental pollution and pollution control. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 3

Introduction to Water Resources is designed to provide the stu­dent with a basic understanding of surface water and groundwater resources, the environmental problems associated with these resources, and the techniques utilized to manage and use these resources.

Credits: 2

Students will learn about drafting cover letters, creating resumes, developing e-portfolios, interviewing and networking skills in this course. They will also explore a myriad of career options in the environmental field and find their best fit. Also during this course students will become familiar with the Student manual for environ­mental studies practicum and understand the instructor, sponsor and student role in cooperative education.

Credits: 1

Environmental Seminar II is an opportunity to prepare for partici­pation in cooperative education and to develop a presentation to be made in a seminar format. Emphasis is placed on continued development of job seeking skills, preparation for the Environmen­tal Studies Practicum, and the skills needed to prepare and make a presentation addressing a current environmental topic.

Credits: 1

Water Quality Seminar is an opportunity for career exploration and development of job seeking skills. Emphasis is placed on familiarization of water quality agencies and businesses, resume’ preparation, and job seeking skills including preparation of job correspondence and application forms, and participation in job interviews.

Credits: 4

Water Distribution and Wastewater Collection Systems is de­signed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the hydrology and hydrologic characteristics of water, the character­istics and capacity of the components of distribution systems, the characteristics and capacities of the components of collection sys­tems, and the mathematical procedures performed to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of distribution and collection systems. Topics covered will include hydraulics and hydrology, water distribution systems, and wastewater collection systems.

Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic under­standing of the hydrology and hydrologic characteristics of water, the characteristics and capacity of the components of distribution systems and collection systems and the procedures performed to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of distribution and collec­tion systems. Topics covered will include hydraulics and hydrolo­gy, water distribution systems, and wastewater collection systems.

Credits: 4

Introduction to Natural Resources Management places an em­phasis on the recognition, inventory, and conservation of natural resources. Attention is given to the distribution and availability of natural resources and the limitations associated with their us­age. Topics covered include management of natural resources, hydrospheric resources, lithospheric resources, and atmospheric resources. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 4

Natural Resources Management Techniques places an emphasis on the problems associated with the usage of natural resources and the techniques available to evaluate, develop, and manage natural resources. Attention is given to renewable resources and the management techniques that can be utilized to best conserve these resources. Topics covered include wildlife management, forest and recreational land management, agricultural and range­land management, and fisheries management.

Credits: 5

Water Processing is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the characteristics of processed water, the technologies utilized to process water, the operation of water distribution and processing systems, and the laboratory techniques performed to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of water processing.  Topics covered will include water processing I, water processing II, water processing III, and water distribution and processing systems operation.

Credits: 5

Water Analysis is designed to provide the student with a basic un­derstanding of water pollution and its impact on water quality; the physical, chemical, and biological parameters utilized to determine the quality of water; and the laboratory techniques performed to measure those water quality parameters. Topic covered will include water quality and pollution, the analysis of physical and chemical water parameters, and the analysis of biological water parameters.

Credits: 5

Wastewater Treatment is designed to provide the student with the understanding of the characteristics of wastewater, technologies utilized to treat wastewater, operation of wastewater collection and treatment systems and the laboratory techniques performed to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of wastewater treatment. Topics covered will include introduction to current issues in water and wastewater treatment operations, basics of wastewater treatment and basics of water and wastewater solids, treatment and management.

Credits: 3

This course will introduce students to the concepts and applica­tions of geographic information systems (GIS).Students will become familiar with using GIS software to visualize, query, cre­ate, edit, analyze and present geospatial data. There will also be exposure to public datasets available today on the internet that can be accessed. Implementing global positioning systems (GPS) will also be used in creating maps in this course.

Credits: 4

Environmental Studies Practicum is an opportunity for students to gain hands-on experience in a field and/or laboratory setting through a cooperative education agreement between the col­lege and the sponsoring agency, business, or individual. The practicum is meant to be an actual job situation in environmental technology or natural resources management.

Credits: 6

Water Quality Internship is an opportunity for students to gain hands-on experience in a field and/or laboratory setting through a cooperative education agreement between the college and the sponsoring agency, business, or industry. The internship is meant to be an actual job experience in water quality technology.

Credits: 3

Fundamentals of bank functions, designed for bankers and pro­spective bankers. Develops an understanding of where banking has been and where it is going. Studies deposit, payment and credit functions as well as funds management and specialized products and services

Credits: 3

The basics of budgeting and buying, the intricacies of home ownership, income tax and investments and the use of insurance, wills and trusts.

Credits: 4

Introductory course for those with no prior background. Students become acquainted with the sounds and structure of French emphasizing useful vocabulary and development of basic conversational skills.

Credits: 4

Progressive development of French language skills with additional emphasis on reading.

Prerequisites: FLF 141 – Elementary French I

Credits: 2

This course is designed to provide non-Spanish speaking profes­sionals with functional skills in Spanish. Spanish phrases, com­mands and questions practical to education are covered. No prior knowledge of Spanish necessary.

Credits: 4

Introduction to the Spanish language and culture; practice in all the basic skills.

Credits: 4

This course aims to continue development of functional proficiency in Spanish through listening, speaking, reading and writing to, and with others. Students will expand their ability to communicate in Spanish in everyday, practical situations.

Prerequisites: FLS 141 – Elementary Spanish I

Credits: 4

Review and expansion of grammar, selected reading and further practice in oral and written communication.

Prerequisites: FLS 142 – Elementary Spanish II

Credits: 4

FLS 242 Intermediate Spanish II provides a course to develop an increasingly complex oral and written comprehension of the Spanish language, while further developing their fluency in writing, speaking, listening, and reading the language.

Prerequisites: FLS 241 – Intermediate Spanish I

Credits:

Introductory course in college geography dealing with location, interaction and interdependence of countries of the world.

Credits: 3

Basic understanding of the components used in an electronic publishing system and an introduction to desktop publishing. Emphasis is on using a computer for page layout using existing art, creating art and combining text and art to create page layouts and output to hard copy. Students will learn about the basics of design and layout, typography and about the many design tools and resources available.

Credits: 3

Introduction to vector based drawing application. Students will create both black and white and multi-color graphics using applica­tion tools and menu commands. Various projects of interest will be completed during the semester that incorporate your understand­ing of drawing tools, color theory, and typography.

Credits: 3

This introductory course covers the core concepts associated with digital imaging. Students learn how to effectively use this software in a graphic design environment; planning and carrying out professional digital imaging projects. This course introduces both basic visual design concepts and a comprehensive understanding of digital workflow, providing the student with a foundation for print, web, interactive, animation, and game design projects.

Credits: 3

This course advances the ideas and techniques taught in Digital Imaging I with an emphasis on advanced techniques. Focus will be put on the understanding of tool setting, curves, levels, blend­ing modes, layer styles, special effects, as well as painting and drawing tools. Students will be challenged as a designer working with real-world projects.

Prerequisites: GRA 140 – Digital Imaging

Credits: 3

An introduction to the creation of graphics and animation for use on web pages using current software programs such as Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, Animate, and Fireworks. This course also takes students through the entire web design process from start to finish including: site definition, site mapping, wire framing, creat­ing mock ups, initiating user tests, and exporting a final website design.

Credits: 3

Students will programmatically create 2-dimensional animations and interactive applications through industry standard languages and platforms. Students will learn how to display graphics on a screen and move them using standard techniques and algorithms. Standard physics and trigonometric formulas will be incorporated to simulate real-world motion.

Prerequisites: CIS 125 – Intro to Programming Logic W/Language

Credits: 3

This course explores the fundamental principles of typography and its role in visual communication. Students will explore both the form and function of typography in design through lectures and demonstrations. Emphasis is placed on the history of type, anatomy of letter forms, and appropriate uses of type.

Credits: 3

Students work with advanced design problems and concepts. A semester long case study of a company will result in the research, design, and production of a marketing plan, logo, research materi­als, and other graphic assets necessary to move the company business strategy forward.

Credits: 3

Balance, proportion and harmony as they apply to printed images on paper. Type selection, copy-fitting, use of ornaments and the psychology of advertising are explored. Students design for web or social media platforms.

Credits: 3

This introductory course focuses on the proper use of web technologies to design and develop web sites. You will use Adobe Dreamweaver to learn how to create properly structured Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheet (CSS) documents, incorporate images, work with colors and backgrounds, present data in tables, and use CSS for laying out web pages.

Credits: 3

This course focuses on advanced Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and Hypertext Markup Language (HTML). Specific advanced Dreamweaver features such as templates, layout, and dynamic page functionality are discussed. The course also focuses on connecting web pages to back end databases using Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP) code. Create, read, update, and delete (CRUD) operations are implemented.

Prerequisites: GRA 234 – Dreamweaver Level I

Credits: 3

This course provides insight into the effective use of color through the study of contemporary color theory including additive and subtractive color. This course involves the development of color perception, expression and application in traditional and digital design, through a series of problem-solving exercises and projects. Fundamental student experiences, along with a historical perspective will provide insight and understanding to the intrinsic power of color in design.

Credits: 1

Opportunity for career exploration and development of job seek­ing skills. Emphasis is placed on familiarization of businesses employing graphic designs, resume preparation, and job seeking skills including preparation of job correspondence and application forms, and participation in job interviews for the purpose of obtain­ing a graphic design internship.

Credits: 1

This class is for the student preparing to graduate. It enables the student to compile accomplished works into a quality portfolio pre­sentation. Different types of digital portfolio systems are discussed and viewed.

Credits: 2 or 4

Supervised, paid work experience in a business or industry involved in an area of graphic design.

Credits: 4

Information and practices to help the food service manager apply sanitation procedures to food handling from purchasing and stor­age to preparation and serving to patrons. This course is part of the National Restaurant Association management development diploma program and certification.

Credits: 5

Preparation of menus and serving foods and aesthetic appeal for dining rooms. Emphasizes meat, vegetables and dessert cookery. Sanitation, quality and cost of foods served to consumers are stressed.

Credits: 4

Practical, ‘how-to’ course focusing on nutrition as it relates to personal health; foods, and food preparation; menu planning and recipe modification; and marketing of nutritious menu items in the food service industry.

Credits: 4

Focuses on the basic principles of diet therapy and menu modi­fication for several diseases. Covers nutrition assessment, care plans, anthropometric measurements, diet history and diet instruc­tion.

Credits: 2

This course will introduce students to all aspects of customer service in the business realm and in the hospitality industry. The students learn the major components of a customer-focused envi­ronment and the key elements of a service culture. In order to be better prepared for the future, students identify key trends that will impact customer service in the years to come.

Credits: 2

Menu Planning and Design introduces the concepts of planning menus for institutional and restaurant food service operations with emphasis on customer expectations and how the menu planner identifies those in establishing a workable menu format. Topics include an overview of menu planning considerations, menu mar­keting and design, and specific criteria for selected restaurants and institutional menus.

Credits: 3

Reviews the fundamentals of mathematics, including methods of figuring percent, discount, mark-up, mark-down and interest. Problems related to the hospitality industry.

Credits: 3

This course offers instruction in the fundamentals of basic cook­ing skills, use of equipment, kitchen safety and basic recipes that are foundations for all culinary learning.

Credits: 3

Provides an awareness of laws concerning hotel-motel manage­ment and illustrates the possible consequences of failure to satisfy legal obligations.

Credits: 2

Hospitality Personnel Management introduces concepts relevant to managing and communicating in the hospitality organization by presenting a perusal of the managerial process. Topics include personnel planning, organizing, staffing, directing, motivating, and problem-solving skills necessary for effective management. Additional topics cover the development of management as a disci­pline, theories and styles of management as well as contemporary functions of the managerial role.

Credits: 2

Students are exposed to a variety of hospitality areas through field trips and interaction with people currently in the hospitality industry. The class will involve job seeking skills and include actual job search and interviewing experience.

Credits: 3

Technical information for persons seeking careers in the hospital­ity management area. Covers the day-to-day complexities of the housekeeping profession, from planning and organizing to bud­geting, supervising and performing the work itself. Certification course offered through the American Hotel and Motel Association.

Credits: 3

A course designed to provide practical insight into the different kinds of meetings and conventions. To provide advice and sug­gestions on how to reach and sell to these important groups and people. To learn the traits to be a successful event planner and how to create a successful event. Will identify and define social concerns and responsibilities; along with reviewing the management finctions for success in the bar beverage business.

Credits: 4

Emphasizes the efficient operation of the front office area, in­cluding reservations, greeting guests, hotel-motel services and payments. Charge account systems and controls, billing methods, checkout procedures and a learning experience with a Front Of­fice Management Simulation included.

Credits: 3

Focuses on the management of food and beverage operations in food and lodging establishments. Includes stewarding, banquets, restaurant, beverage and room service. Prepares students for internships in food and lodging operations.

Credits: 1

Developing leadership, teamwork, communication, commitment and cooperation as required in the hospitality industry.

Grading: P/Q

Credits: 1

Developing leadership, teamwork, communication, commitment and cooperation as required in the hospitality industry.

Grading: P/Q

Credits: 1

Developing leadership, teamwork, communication, commitment and cooperation as required in the hospitality industry.

Grading: P/Q

Credits: 1

Developing leadership, teamwork, communication, commitment and cooperation as required in the hospitality industry.

Grading: P/Q

Credits: 6

On-the-job training, usually full-time, in a hotel, motel, restaurant or related business.

Credits: 3

Workplace experience (on-the-job training), is usually full-time, in a hotel, motel, restaurant or related business.

Prerequisites: Hotel/ Motel Restaurant Management Student and successful comple­tion of Sanitation exam

Credits: 3

A continuation of Workplace Experience I (on-the-job training), usually full-time, in a hotel, motel, restaurant or related business.

Prerequisites Hotel/Motel Restaurant Management Student, suc­cessful completion of Sanitation exam, and HCM 939 – Workplace Experience I

Credits: 3

An introduction to HVAC systems, with an emphasis on electri­cal and mechanical fundamentals skills, including AC and DC electricity; electrical power supplies and wiring materials; meter operations; mechanical math and measurement; fasteners; and PVC assembly.

Prerequisites: SER 124 – Industrial Safety

Credits: 3

This course covers fundamental principles and skills for all com­mon heating systems. This course is a combined lecture and lab course and includes discussions and demonstrations in heating fundamentals. Safety is greatly emphasized as students are work­ing with actual voltages, and working equipment.

Corequisites: HCR 102 – Intro to HVAC and SER 124 – Industrial Safety

Credits: 3

This course is a combined lecture and lab course studying the theory and applications in electrical resistance and oil and hydron­ic heating systems as they relate to residential and commercial heat loss requirements. Studies include installation, troubleshoot­ing wiring and control circuits.

Prerequisites: HCR 112 – Heating Fundamentals and HCR 444 – HVACR Systems I

Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the fun­damentals of troubleshooting by utilizing a practical and system­atic approach to locate and repair heating system malfunctions. The student will also have the opportunity to study, in detail, the motors and controls used in today’s heating systems. Topics to be covered include basic electric circuits, electrical test meters, mo­tors and controls, diagnosis of electrical and mechanical malfunc­tions, and special emphasis on wiring diagrams.

Prerequisites: HCR 102 – Intro to HVAC and SER 124 – Industrial Safety

Credits: 3

This course is a combined lecture and lab course which deals with the fundamentals of residential air conditioning systems. Emphasizes system components, types of refrigerants, principles of heat transfer, and diagnosis and repair of various systems used in the air conditioning industry. Studies relationship to temperature and pressure variance including psychrometric comparison as applied to commercial and residential air conditioning.

Prerequisites: HCR 102 – Intro to HVAC and SER 124 – Industrial Safety

Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the fun­damentals of troubleshooting by utilizing a practical and system­atic approach to locate and repair air-conditioning and heat pump system malfunctions. The student will also have the opportunity to study, in detail, the motors and controls used in today’s air-con­ditioning and heat pump systems. Topics to be covered include basic electric circuits, electrical test meters, motors and controls, diagnosis of electrical and mechanical malfunctions, and special emphasis on wiring diagrams.

Prerequisites: HCR 444 – HVACR Systems I

Credits: 3

This course covers all types of commercial heating and cooling systems. Systems included are air cooled and water cooled air conditioning systems, cooling towers, water chillers, gas and elec­tric heating systems for heating air and water, industrial heating systems including direct fired make up air equipment. Commercial water heaters and controls will also be discussed.

Prerequisites: HCR 444 – HVACR Systems I

 

Credits: 3

This course is a combined lecture and lab course covering the theory and laws governing refrigeration, the operation of refrigera­tion systems, heat transfer, components, and test equipment. It also covers the different soldering and brazing methods and ma­terials used in refrigeration service. Emphasis is on the recovery, recycling and charging methods used.

Prerequisites: HCR 102 – Intro to HVAC and SER 124 – Industrial Safety

Credits: 3

This course presents a more advanced study of electrical controls and their applications, an introduction electronics and the controls used in the H.V.A.C.R.systems.

Prerequisites: ELE 136 – Basic Electricity II

Credits: 4

This course presents alternative application of energy sources and equipment as they apply to heating, ventilation, air cooling, and refrigeration systems.

Prerequisites: HCR 102 – Intro to HVAC and SER 124 – Industrial Safety

Credits: 3

A study of the construction and design of duct work and related duct fittings. Includes correct layout and sizing of ducts, return and supply grills, and use of airflow measuring instruments.

Credits: 3

This course is designed to examine the consumption of energy in commercial and industrial buildings and how energy usage may be reduced.

 

Credits: 4

On the job training for Heating, Air Conditioning, and Ventilation program.

Prerequisites: HCR 102 – Intro to HVAC

Credits: 3

Surveys the origins of human civilization in the Near East, the great rise of Greece and Rome and concludes with the Enlighten­ment.

Credits: 3

Examines an extremely dynamic phase of European and world history.

Credits: 3

Study of national foundations, colonial background, revolution, confederation and institutions; nationalism and expansion. The growth of democracy and war plus reconstruction are analyzed.

Credits: 3

Covers re-union growth of big business, expansion and World War I, rise to world power, isolation, modern industry, depression, recovery and internationalism.

Credits: 3

This course is an introductory course in Iowa History, as it relates to national and international history.  This course examines the natural environment of Iowa, as it shaped and was shaped by the native people, early settlers through the early years, statehood, World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, and more recent years.  Special attention is given to ethnic groups and their contributions.

Credits: 3

Investigation of the rise of the United States after World War II to the modern country of the present. Topics include: aftermath of World War II, nuclear power, the Cold War, Vietnam, diplomacy, presidential power, and family life.

Credits: 3

Deals with the experience of blacks in the history of the United States. Topics include African Heritage, the slave trade, slavery in the Antebellum South, the Civil War and emancipation, the Jim Crow era, the Harlem Renaissance, the civil rights struggle, and modern black America.

Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to diagnostic coding, a classification system used for identification of disease and diagnostic processes, to support medical necessity for procedures and reimbursement.  Emphasis will be placed on accuracy, concepts and compliance issues.

Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to procedural coding, a classification system used for identification of procedures, medical supplies, and services, to correlate with diagnostic codes to support medical necessity for reimbursement.  Emphasis will be placed on accuracy, coding concepts, and compliance issues.

Credits: 3

This course will enable the student to describe the different types of code sets and classification systems used in healthcare. It will also enable the student to understand the basic steps involved implementing and using an electronic health record and utilizing Microsoft Access to build, store, and retrieve information from a database.

Credits: 2

Develops proficiency in the use of dictation and transcription equipment.  Medical cases will be utilized to acquire skills that will enable the student to design and transcribe multiple types of reports utilized in medical facilities.  Application, proofreading as well as medical terminology and anatomy are continuous within the learning process.

Prerequisites: CSC 110 – Intro to Computers and HSC 114 – Medical Terminology

Corequisites: BIO 173 – Human Anatomy & Physiology II and HSC 217 – Introduction to Pathology

 

Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide information on career options for individuals who are interested in pursuing a career in the healthcare industry.  It includes the study of team dynamics and communication techniques necessary to work and succeed in the healthcare field.  Students are given opportunities for career exploration through research and projects utilizing the internet and library database.  It also provides instruction in browsing the internet, using email, and other computer literacy tools necessary for taking online courses and for careers in the healthcare industry.

Credits: 3

Studies medical terminology, including spelling and definitions.

Credits: 1

Emergency care for the injured. Airway management, hemorrhage control, care for shock victims, CPR/lifesaving skills.

Grading: P/Q

Credits: 1

Dosage Calculations emphasizes the basic math skills and dos­age calculations required of nurse professionals.

Grading: P/Q

Credits: 3

The academic component of the program preparing persons for employment as a nurse aide in long term care and in skilled nursing units in Iowa hospitals. Upon satisfactory completion of the course, which meets both federal and state requirements, the student is eligible to write the state-approved competency examination and skills test for certification.

Credits: 3

Classroom and clinical experience combine to provide training in basic nursing skills, attitudes and understanding the role of the nurse aide.

Prerequisites: HSC 172 – Nurse Aide

Credits: 1

This course focuses on knowledge and skills to prepare and respond in emergency situations. Students will receive training in first aid techniques, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), fire safety, and emergency preparedness for natural disasters.

Credits: 2

Health Informatics will provide an overview of basic computer skills as well as introduce the student to concepts related to information literacy and management. Utilization of informatics within the healthcare delivery systems including application of the Health Information Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) will be included.

Credits: 3

This course provides introduction to body systems with discussion of correlating diseases and disorders, etiology, signs and symptoms, progression, and standard approaches to diagnosis and treatment.

Credits: 3

Goals, values and legal aspects of the social work profession­als. Roles of social workers in human service institutions. Service learning experience at an agency is included.

Credits: 3

Introduces classifications, etiology, characteristics, educational and vocational considerations of persons with disabilities.

Credits: 3

This is an introductory course in applied counseling techniques. Students are introduced to a variety of facilitative skills and counseling concepts and work through the interviewing process in simulated helping service settings.

Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the value base of human ser­vices and helping professions. Addresses strategies and prac­tices used in assessing and evaluating client needs, establishing and identifying resources and making appropriate referrals. In­take interviews and assessments are explored. Students will de­velop knowledge and basic skills in the area of programming and developing support systems and community resources. Students will increase awareness of working with high risk populations.

Credits: 3

This course is designed to introduce students to a multidimension­al approach to assessment in making objective patient placement decisions for various levels of care for the treatment and care of substance-related disorders. This course will help prepare stu­dents for their practicum experience.

Credits: 3

Supervised experience in a chemical dependency agency as ap­proved by the program coordinator and Iowa Board of Certification for Substance Abuse.

Credits: 4

The course provides additional supervised experience in chemical dependency agency as approved by the program coordinator and Iowa Board of Certification for Substance Abuse.

Credits: 3

Introduction to the 35mm camera: selection and handling; theory of light; lenses and focusing; depth of field and film types; compo­sition; film processing and basic darkroom techniques.

Credits: 3

Basic digital theory, how the digital camera works. Includes digital capture of both still and video; input into the computer; digital manipulation; basic Photoshop and photography; saving digital images for future use and long term archiving. How to prepare digital images for print social media, web and other uses and how to send digital images after formatting for upload.

Credits: 3

This course will teach the basic photographic skills needed to create publishable news photographs as well as basic photographic skills needed tocreate photographs for advertising use.

Prerequisites: JOU 171 – Introduction to Photography, JOU 173 – Digital Photography

Credits: 3

This course will develop skills needed for adjusting and enhancing photographic images after image capture and before going to a final output. The emphasis will be on images used in the photog­raphy professions of Portrait, Photojournalism Commercial, and Forensic. All image manipulations and adjustments will be done with computer imaging software, such as Photoshop.

Prerequisites: JOU 171 – Introduction to Photography, JOU 173 – Digital Photography

Credits: 3

Designed to acquaint students with the fundamentals of digital reporting through digital media including Internet, social media, photography, video, audio, and multimedia as it applies to journal­ism. Instruction will include conceptual frameworks and techniques to create multimedia journalism content; the connection to multimedia stakeholders, marketing strategies, and community building; cover­age of events with multimedia approaches; the technical and creative aspects of digital writing; delivery platforms for multimedia content including the Web and evolving communication technologies.

Credits: 2-5

Practical work experience related to journalism.

Credits: 2

An introduction to the legal profession, with special emphasis on the responsibilities of the paralegal. Students will learn the core skills required of paralegals, including verbal and written commu­nication, critical thinking and analytical reasoning, and investiga­tion and case management.

Credits: 1

This course familiarizes students with law office specific software applications. A representative law office software platform will be utilized to present students with hands-on exercises to further their understanding of the various functions of law office software.

Credits: 2

This course will introduce students to the types of ethical dilem­mas that they will face in the law office setting; generally to the ethical rules developed by the American Bar Association, to the rules adopted by this jurisdiction for the regulation of attorney and paralegal conduct, to the model codes of paralegal associations; and to methods for researching the answers to ethical dilemmas.

Credits: 3

A study of wills, trusts, probate procedures, estate administration taxes, and testate and intestate succession. Students will learn how to draft basic wills, trusts, and advance health care directives. Students will also learn how to administer a typical estate.

Credits: 4

This course introduces students to various print and electronic le­gal research media, with a heightened focus on state of Iowa and federal statutory and case law. Students will learn how to carry out legal research assignments using both primary and second­ary resources. The methods of updating and expanding research and how to properly cite legal sources in memoranda and other documents will also be presented. Print and electronic methods for finding legal authority will be utilized.

Prerequisites: ENG 105 – Composition I – C or Better

Credits: 4

In this course, students will utilize and apply the research skills developed in Legal Research (LGL 151), to research and draft opinion letters and other types of legal correspondence, an objective interoffice memorandum, and a persuasive motion brief. Appellate briefs will also be introduced. A foundational aspect of the course will be developing students’ legal reasoning skills.

Prerequisites: LGL 154 – Legal Research

Credits: 3

A study of tort law, including negligent, intentional, and strict li­ability torts. Students will learn how to draft pleadings, discovery requests, and pretrial documents in tort cases.

Credits: 3

A study of the American trial process. Students will research, prepare and present a hypothetical case to a judge and jury.

Credits: 3

Study of what law applies to the Employment setting. Introduction to Employment Discrimination, Whisteblower Protection, Wage and Hours laws, Sexual Harassment, Worker’s Compensation, Employer Tort Liability, Unemployment Insurance, and liability is­sues arising under OSHA, ERISA and other Federal Statutes.

Credits: 3

This course surveys the basic principles of contract law, including capacity, formation, conditions, enforcement, statute of frauds, performance and breach, remedies, defenses, and third-party rights. Portions of the Uniform Commercial Code relating to contracts for the sale of goods will also be discussed. The role of the paralegal in gathering information, researching, and drafting contract documents is emphasized throughout.

Credits: 3

Examination of the more common crimes, criminal defenses and the procedures used to process a criminal case from arrest to final disposition.

Credits: 3

Introduces students to the various practice rules of procedure in the civil court system, and the role of a paralegal at every stage of pre-trial litigation. The rules of civil procedure and evidence at both the state and federal level will be emphasized. Topics cov­ered include initial client contact, interviewing, investigation and identification of claims and issues, initiating and responding to the lawsuit, the discovery process, settlement, trial preparation, and preparation and filing of appropriate litigation documents.

Credits: 3

Study of law and procedures relative to marriage, dissolution and adoption.

Credits: 4

Supervised work experience in a law office, legal services office or other law-related agency.

Credits: 2

Supervised work experience in a law office, legal services office, or other law-related agency.

Credits: 3

An introduction to the study of short fiction, poetry, and drama.

Credits: 3

Explores major American writers (including Native Americans) and their contributions to American letters from Puritan times to 1865.

Credits: 3

Explores major American writers and their contributions to Ameri­can letters from the post-Civil War era through modern periods.

Credits: 3

Literature from the Ancients, classical Greece and the Renaissance.

Credits: 3

Evolution of the short story as a literary form, with emphasis on analysis and appreciation.

Credits: 3

This course is designed to help adults who work with young adults become more familiar with teens and their literature, and select the best literature available based upon criteria and sources that allow for the selection of the best literature for young adults.

Credits: 3

This course is designed to emphasize the functions and practices of administrative procedures in a medial office. Students will be introduced to the profession of administrative medical assisting and the various responsibilities of a healthcare professional. Topics include, but are not limited to medical law and ethics, verbal and written communication skills, managing appointments, introduction to health information management, and computer applications in the medical office.

Credits: 3

This course is the second of a two course sequence that focuses on the administrative skills and techniques needed for competence as an administrative medical office professional.  Students are provided instruction in medical coding practices including diagnostic and procedural coding systems.  Instruction is provided in medical billing practices involving health insurance plan options, carrier requirements, state and federal regulations, abstracting relevant information from source documents, and completion of claim forms.

Prerequisites: BIO 168 – Human Anatomy & Physiology I & HSC 114 Medical Terminology

Corequisites: BIO 173 – Human Anatomy & Physiology II & HSC 217 Introduction to Pathology

Credits: 2

Through use of a simulation electronic medical record (EMR), the student will learn the basics of computerized medical patient systems. The student will be able to identify the different areas, procedures and components for medical patient computer systems as well as use the software for patient information organization and billing.

Credits: 3

Students develop an understanding of various health insurance plan options and general state and federal regulations. Instruction will be given in the areas of abstracting information from source documents, applying appropriate procedure and diagnostic codes, accurately completing insurance claim forms and the process of claim submission to third party payers.

Credits: 4

Introduction to the Physician’s Office Laboratory, safety measures and familiarization with the care and use of laboratory equipment. Techniques in venipuncture and capillary blood collection, laboratory specimen collection and processing.  Performance of CLIA waived testing (Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment) including urinalysis, hematology, chemistry, immunology and microbiology.

Credits: 3

This course is the first of a two-course sequence that focuses on basic clinical skills and techniques needed for competency in the Medical Assistant profession. Instruction is given in obtaining vital signs, recording patient history, assisting with patient exams, aseptic and sterile techniques, assisting with minor office procedures, and medication administration.

Credits: 3

This course is the second of a two-course sequence that focuses on the clinical skills and techniques needed for competence in the Medical Assistant profession. Instruction is given for a variety of specialty exams, including but not limited to dermatology, orthopedics, pulmonology, cardiology, women’s health, pediatrics and geriatrics.

Credits: 2

This course is designed to provide the student with legal and ethical knowledge to make proper professional judgments. Topics include legal issues pertinent to the medical and chiropractic clin­ics. Major bioethical and ethical issues are included.

Credits: 2

This course introduces the Allied Health student to concepts of drug actions and interactions with focus on principles of pharma­cology. Students will learn to utilize drug reference books with review on medical terminology as it pertains to prescriptions, documentation, medication administration, medication classifica­tions, and mechanism of action.

Credits: 3

The practicum provides an opportunity for students to apply classroom theory to on-the-job experiences in an ambulatory medical facility. Students will work under the supervision of clinic staff, participating in patient care activities within the administrative, clinical, and laboratory departments.  Students will enhance skills by interacting with physicians, clinic staff and patients.  Students are evaluated by the clinic supervisors and the practicum coordinator.

Credits: 2

Students will transfer knowledge gained from Limited Radiology I and II into the clinical setting. The student will perform a total of 80 hours of clinical experience, completing 12 clinical competencies. Six hours of face to face lecture will include instruction of special radiologic views prior to beginning the clinical rotation.

Credits: 1

Basic mathematics course designed for students in certificate programs.

Credits: 3

Developmental studies course that reviews whole numbers, integers, fractions, decimals, percents, ratios, proportions, and graphing utilizing basic algebra.

Credits: 4

This course includes the basic properties of the real number system; fundamental operations on algebraic expressions; graphs and functions and relations; radicals; exponents; quadratic equations; graphing calculators to enhance their understanding .

Prerequisites: Appropriate mathematics assessment score. Does not count toward the mathematics requirements for the AA or AS degree.

Credits: 3

This is a general survey course which includes sets; number systems; elementary algebra; exponents; equations and inequalities; fractions; ratios; proportion and variation; probability and statistics; elementary graphing; consumer mathematics; and an introduction to geometry.

Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score

Credits: 3

Basic mathematical content pertinent to elementary teaching.Topics include problem solving, set theory, number systems and bases, number theory, informal geometry, measurement and elementary probability, and statistics. Does not count toward the mathematics requirement for the AA or A.S. degree.

Credits: 3

Operation of real and complex numbers; factoring; exponents; quadratic equations; inequalities; matrices; rational functions; logarithmic functions; and graphing or functions .

Prerequisites: Ap­propriate placement score

Credits: 4

Topics include linear functions and inequalities; quadratics; conics; polynomials and rational functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; linear systems; matrices and determinants .Additional topics may include sequences, series, permutations, combinations and probability.

Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score

Credits: 5

Course combines college algebra and trigonometry .Algebra top-ics covered include functions and their graphs; solving equations and inequalities; polynomial functions; conic sections; and exponential and logarithmic functions .Trigonometry topics covered are right triangle trigonometry; unit circles; trigonometric functions; graphing; verifying identities; solving trigonometric equations; and applications of trigonometry.

Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score

Credits: 3

An applied mathematics course dealing with mathematics related to most academic disciplines .It provides introduction to matrices, linear programming, combinations, permutations, statistics, mathematics of finance.

Prerequisites: MAT 110 – Math for Liberal Arts, MAT 120 – College Algebra, MAT 121 – College Algebra, or MAT 127 – College Algebra and Trig

Credits: 3

This course provides a foundation of statistical concepts and procedures that can aid the student as both a consumer and pro­ducer of statistical information. The course emphasizes descrip­tive and inferential statistical methods, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing and linear regression. Students are introduced to technology as it applies to introductory statistical methods.

Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score

Credits: 4

This course provides a foundation of statistical concepts and pro­cedures that can aid the student as both a consumer and produc­er of statistical information. The course emphasizes descriptive and inferential statistical methods, probability, estimation, hypoth­esis testing and linear regression. Students are also introduced to software as it applies to introductory statistical methods.

Prerequisites
appropriate placement score

Credits: 4

This course is the first of a series of three courses. The purpose of the sequence is to provide the student with a foundation in calculus and analytic geometry. Those students enrolled in the science, math, engineering, computer science, and similar fields, will also gain proficiency and develop an understanding how these tools will be used later on in their studies. Topics include analytic geometry, differentiation, and applications of derivation and integration.  Graphing calculator required. 

Prerequisites: MAT 127 – College Algebra and Trig or equivalent

Credits: 5

A general course in differential and integral calculus and its ap­plications. Topics include limits and continuity; differentiation; application of differentiation; integration; logarithmic, exponential and other transcendental functions; and applications of integration.

Prerequisites: MAT 127 – College Algebra and Trig or equivalent

Credits: 5

Continuation of MAT 211. Integration techniques, sequences, infinite series, conic sections, parametric equations, polar coordi­nates, vectors, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, and vector-67 values functions.

Prerequisites: MAT 211 – Calculus I or equivalent

Credits: 3

Continuation of MAT 217. Explores functions of several variables; partial derivatives; directional derivatives and gradients; multiple integration; vector analysis; and a brief look at differential equations.

Prerequisites: MAT 217 – Calculus II or equivalent

Credits: 4

Students learn to recognize various types of differential equations and learn how their solutions behave. Topics include solving first and second order differential equations, applications, systems of equations, Laplace transforms and series solutions, existence theorems, numerical methods, and partial differential equations.

Prerequisites: MAT 217 – Calculus II

Credits: 3

Technical Math includes operations with real numbers, use of fractions, ratios, measurement conversion, algebraic equations, functions, geometry, and right angle trigonometry. Applications are designed around situations students may encounter in industrial settings

Credits: 2

A review of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percentages, linear and angular measurements and common formulas used in each particular industry.

Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score

Credits: 3

A course in elementary mathematical skills for technicians. Topics covered include fundamental operations with whole numbers, fractions, decimals and signed numbers; percents; geometric figures and basic constructions; area and volume formulas; English/Metric systems; measurements; and basic algebraic equations and applications.

Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score

Credits: 2

Teaches students to: participate in periodic internal quality audit activities; check calibration of gages and other data collection equipment; suggest continuous improvements; inspect materials and product/process at all stages to ensure they meet specifica­tions; document the results of quality tests; communicate quality problems; take corrective actions to restore or maintain quality; record process outcomes and trends; identify fundamentals of blueprint reading; and use common measurement systems and precision measurement tools.

Credits: 1

This course covers the principles and techniques of lean manufac­turing. Topics include lean principles, value stream mapping, total productive maintenance, manufacturing cells, office cells, setup reduction, pull systems and continuous improvement.

Credits: 3

Principles of Management provides the student with a conceptual framework for understanding the basic theories of management. Emphasis is placed on the internal and external environment, ethics, planning, goal setting, decision making, organizational structure, motivation and group dynamics, and effective control mechanisms for establishing and accomplishing business objectives.

Credits: 3

Practical approach to the study of establishing and operating a small business. Emphasis will be placed on discussion of case situations and on arriving at viable solutions to day-to-day opera­tional problems.

Credits: 3

An overview of the supervisory job. Basics of supervision and management, including effective human relations skills such as communication, motivation, improving performance and leading work teams. Centers on management functions of planning, orga­nizing, controlling and evaluating. Introduction to key supervisory techniques including delegation, appraisal and counseling.

Credits: 3

Principles and success factors for quality improvement for work group supervisors. Focus on skills and knowledge needed by supervisors to lead quality improvement in their work areas. Quality philosophies, concepts and improvement actions will be highlighted. Programs such as ISO 9000 and the Malcolm Bal­dridge Award will be discussed. Participants will prepare quality improvement plan for their work groups.

Credits: 3

The course is a combination of theoretical and practical approaches to human resource management. Topics include, but not limited to job design, employee selection, employee development, employee appraisal, and employee termination. Federal statues relating to EEO, Affirmative Action, OSHA, and Labor Unions are explored. Employee compensation and fringe benefits packages are also discussed.

Credits: 3

Study of the “legalese” of workplace law, covering hiring, firing, promoting, and disciplining employees. Students will learn proper reference checking procedures, sexual harassment issues, equal employment opportunity and affirmative action policies.

Credits: 3

This course is designed to give students a clear understanding of the elements of the marketing mix (4P’s) and explanation of environmental issues that are employed in business to gain a competitive edge in the global economy. Includes identification of consumer and organizational needs and an understanding of the basic consumer behavior components.

Credits: 3

Studies the concepts of selling. Includes an understanding of the customer; realizing the importance of product knowledge; secur­ing and conducting sales presentations, analyzing and handling different types of customers; steps in selling; and the importance of maintaining good will.Personality development and principles of selling are stressed.

Credits: 3

This course is designed to teach the principles of consumer behavior. Topics included are the following: external influences such as culture, social class, family and situations; internal influences such as motivation, attitudes, lifestyles, and learning; various models of consumer behavior; and how consumer behavior fits into marketing strategy. We will look at what makes consumers buy what they buy, when they buy, how they buy, and why they buy. Once marketers have a better understanding of this, a more efficient and effective method of marketing can be accomplished.

Credits: 3

Fundamentals and principles of advertising as they pertain to the marketing process. Understanding consumer motivation, iden­tifying the target market, types of media and creation of ads are included.

Credits: 4

A study of the principles and elements of design and their relationship to an effective display. Hands on experience in creating effective displays and planning a visual merchandisers schedule. The students learn about display materials and store layout in relation to effective selling.

Credits: 3

Techniques and procedures used in determining profits, pricing of goods, inventories and merchandise control. Typical problems faced by merchandisers are presented, analyzed and solved.

Credits: 1

This course helps develop competent professionals in marketing management and merchandising. Professionalism contributes to occupational competence by promoting greater understanding and appreciation for the responsibilities of citizenship in our private enterprise system.

Credits: 1

Continuation of the MKT 290. This course helps develop competent professionals in marketing management and merchandising. Professionalism contributes to occupational competence by promoting greater understanding and appreciation for the responsibilities of citizenship in our private enterprise system.

Credits: 1

Continuation of the professional development training in DECA.

Credits: 1

Continuation of MKT 292 with more opportunities for professional advancement.

Credits: 2

A course designed to give the student trainee actual work experience in the operational phases of the modern retail market. The assignment given students will be tailored to the student’s needs. They include: basic merchandising, displays, cash register experience and selling to customers. Students will be under the supervision of the coordinator of the program and be assigned to work directly under a specific store manager who serves as the on-the-job-trainer.

Credits: 3

An introductory course that studies mass media and society. The class includes a historical and contemporary overview of indus­tries, professions, processes and social effects of the mass media.

Credits: 1

This course studies the variety of careers available within the digital and social media profession. As the role of the traditional broadcast journalist has experienced a merging of responsibilities from its counterparts, the emphasis of this course will be to pro­vide the students with an opportunity to explore new and emerg­ing media technologies. The curriculum will be mainly built around presentations from guest speakers and field trips.

Credits: 3

This class will introduce the student to not only digital video and audio production but also editing. Students will develop control-board skills, production skills, discipline and structure in addition to identifying video production elements including camera, light­ing, audio, switching, editing and special effects.

Credits: 3

In an age when consumers actively seek multiple platforms and sources for vital information, strong writing skills have never been so important. This course develops digital journalists’ writing abilities by focusing on: organizing complex information, layer­ing primary and secondary sources, developing leads that hook, structuring narrative and teasing out tension, and developing a credible voice. Students will also advance their understanding of grammar and editing and refine their creative thinking and language skills.

Credits: 3

Students will learn to communicate effectively by using their voice and body language as a means of communicating the message.  Skills in voice and articulation, acting, persuasion, and pronunciation are studies along with techniques of relaxation and vocal dynamics.  Many exercises are taught to help prepare speech and vocal skills essential to broadcasting.

Credits: 2

Recognize how a radio station operates and understanding and developing quality announcing skills with a microphone.

Credits: 2

Radio station operations and practices in the college radio station. The majority of the programming and performance of the station will be the responsibility of students in this course.

Credits: 3

This course will provide an overview of legal theories, principles, and rules governing digital media law. The course will explore the ethics behind the laws and actions discussed in class.  At the end of the course, students will possess a working knowledge of media law, including issues relating to First Amendment rights, copyright infringement, intellectual property, defamation, libel, slander, and consumer protection, and will have critical thinking skills to examine situations from an ethical standpoint.

Credits: 3

Production of pre-scripted programs for the local cable public ac­cess station. Students will perform as crew members in various studio productions.

Prerequisites: MMS 115 – TV Studio Production

Credits: 4

Radio station operations and practices in the college radio station. The majority of the programming and performance of the station will be the responsibility of students in this course.

Credits: 2

Students will work in teams, design and create engage multimedia projects that incorporate various media elements such as audio and video; graphics and animation; webcasts and podcasts; radio and television broadcasting and blogs and social media presenta­tions.

Credits: 2

A continuation of Multimedia Projects I. Students will design and create multimedia projects that incorporate various media ele­ments such as audio and video; graphics and animation; web­casts and podcasts; radio and television broadcasting and blogs & social media presentations.

Prerequisites: MMS 401 – Multimedia Projects I

Credits: 2

A continuation of Multimedia Projects II MMS 402. Students will design and create multimedia projects that incorporate various media elements such as audio and video; graphics and animation; webcasts and podcasts; radio and television broadcasting and blogs & social media presentations.

Prerequisites: MMS 402 – Multimedia Projects II

Credits: 2

A continuation of Multimedia Projects III MMS 403. Students will design and create multimedia projects that incorporate various media elements such as audio and video; graphics and animation; webcasts and podcasts; radio and television broadcasting and blogs & social media presentations.

Prerequisites: MMS 403 – Multimedia Projects III

Credits: 2

Students accumulate 140 or more hours of work-related experi­ence at broadcasting institutions or other approved facilities. Students gain specific skills in a practical job setting.

Credits: 2

Engine disassembly, reassembly, operation of various motorcycle and ATV engines. Includes adjustment and testing of engines.

Prerequisites: First semester of program

Corequisites: MOT 131 – Motorcycle Engine 2&4 Stroke

Credits: 3

This course includes the construction and design of motorcycle engines, both two and four stroke. Correct service procedures, troubleshooting, failure analysis, and theory.

Credits: 3

Motorcycle fuel systems including carburetion, fuel injection and oil injection. Troubleshooting, testing, adjustments and disas­sembly/reassembly are covered. Proper service procedures are discussed, demonstrated and practiced. Lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisites: First two semesters of program

Credits: 4

This course covers the functions, construction, and operation of motorcycle drive systems, chassis, and suspension systems. Their importance in the safe operation and control of a motorcycle is discussed. Disassembly, assembly, troubleshooting, and repair of these components are covered.

Credits: 3

Study of the construction, principles of operation and design of motorcycle ignition and electrical systems.

Credits: 1

Safe shop practices and procedures, including safe equipment op­eration, proper tool usage, importance of personal protective gear and how to handle emergency situations.

Corequisites: MSE 143 – Small Engines Theory

Credits:

Basic electrical theory used in the motorcycle and small engine field. Study of Ohm’s Law, electrical symbols, problem solving, types of circuits, usage of a VOM and other electrical test equipment .Lecture and laboratory.

Corequisites: MSE 143 – Small Engines Theory

Credits: 3

Introduction to ATV’s and all of their systems.

Credits: 4

This course includes tune up procedures for both two and four stroke engines. Since it is not only the engines that require maintenance, the maintenance items for Motorcycles and ATVs themselves are also covered in depth.

Credits: 4

This course will better prepare the student for real life drivability and troubleshooting problems that they will encounter in the field.

Credits: 4

This course provides the student with the advanced electrical diagnosis and troubleshooting skills needed to work in the Motor­cycle and Small Engine Industry.

Credits: 4

This course will prepare the student to better diagnose, trouble­shoot, and tune fuel systems. It will also better prepare them to be able to tune all types of fuel systems to be able to meet emis­sions standards.

Credits: 2

This course includes Dyno usage, data analysis, and tuning.

Credits: 3

An introduction to Outdoor Power Equipment.

Credits: 2

A study of the basic diesel engine used in small horsepower applications. Diesel fuel systems, turbo charging, diesel engine maintenance, and troubleshooting.

Credits: 4

Student is involved in a supervised cooperative work experience in a dealership.

Credits: 2

On-the-job experience at a motorcycle repair facility as a techni­cian, part and service person, or salesperson. The student is evaluated by the job supervisor and the instructor.

Prerequisites: Completion of the first year of the program

Credits: 3

Basic two- and four-stroke engine theory, design and construction. All basic systems are studied, as well as troubleshooting, failure analysis and repair procedures. Service literature, warranties and engine identification are covered.

Credits: 3

Complete disassembly and reassembly of modern engines, troubleshooting, failure analysis and proper repair techniques. Hands-on testing and inspection of engine systems.

Corequisites: MSE 143 – Small Engines Theory

Credits: 2

This course will cover basic system operations of boats and off season storage, including how to properly operate a boat, dock and tie up a boat, the purpose of instrument gauges and accessories, marine industry terminology and how to identify various serial numbers. Considerable practice will be provided in properly winterizing boats and personal watercraft for off season storage.

Credits: 1

This course will cover basic detailing of boats and personal water­craft, to include removal of mild oxidation; wax build up and fine scratches, how to properly restore optimum gloss, especially on dark colors, and how to provide long lasting protection from harm­ful UV rays.You will additionally learn how to clean and protect teakwood. This course provides practice in basic correct use of a buffer, detail cleaners, waxes, polishes and protectants, how to identify specific problems and possible solutions.

Credits: 2

This course will cover basic rigging operation of boats and per­sonal watercraft, including how to properly install motors and all necessary wiring, how to properly determine what motor should be installed and how to install gauges, depth finders, stereos and other equipment. The course will also include trailer set up pro­cedures, the purpose of instrument gauges and accessories on boats. Factory service manuals, electronic and paper, will be used to look up parts as you learn marine industry terminology and how to identify various serial numbers on motors.

Credits: 3

In this course, students learn proper shop management proce­dures including parts ordering, inventory, repair order writing, payroll, employee-employer relations, customer relations and communication skills, sales and service in the service center, war­ranty procedures on marine products, computerized parts/billing systems and waste management procedures.

Credits: 1

Safe shop practices and procedures, including safe equipment operation, proper tool usage, importance of personal protective gear and how to handle emergency situations.

Credits: 2

Introduction to the various types of drives which may be encoun­tered. Construction, operation, maintenance and repair of outdoor power and other systems including transmissions; clutches; belt drives; sprockets and chain drives; and hydrostatic drives. Assem­bly, disassembly, inspection, troubleshooting and repair of these systems is covered. Lecture and laboratory.(Formerly SM-152C)

Credits: 3

Basic electrical theory used in the small engine and marine field. Study of Ohm’s Law, electrical symbols, problem solving, types of circuits, usage of a VOM and other electrical test equipment. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 1

This course is designed to introduce gasoline and diesel powered electrical generator systems. Students will be introduced to how generators function and how to properly set up and maintain this type of power equipment.

Prerequisites: MSE 151 – Shop Safety and Procedures

Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to the various types of drives and power delivery systems which will be encountered in the outdoor power equipment industry. Construction, operation, maintenance, and repair of outdoor power equipment, and other systems including transmissions, clutches, belt dives, sprocket and chain drive, hydraulics, and hydrostatic drives. Assembly, disassembly, inspection, troubleshooting, and repair of these systems are also covered.

Prerequisites: MSE 143 – Small Engines Theory

Credits: 3

Snowmobile systems including clutches, suspensions, engines, tracks and other components are studied. Proper service tech­niques, troubleshooting, assembly and disassembly are covered along with a unit on performance work. Lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisites: MSE 151 – Shop Safety and Procedures

Credits: 2

Construction and design of two- and four-stroke marine engines. Correct service procedures, troubleshooting, failure analysis and advanced theory are covered.

Prerequisites: First semester of program

Credits: 2

Corresponding lab to Marine Engines Two and Four Stroke Theory. Hands-on testing and inspection of marine engines.

Credits: 3

This course covers operation and construction of Marine Stern­drives, Inboard Drive Systems and Outboard Gear Cases. Also covered will be disassembly, assembly, inspection, troubleshoot­ing, failure analysis, identification, rebuilding drives, adjustments procedures, advance theory and repair procedures as well as performance testing and propeller theory.

Credits: 3

Marine fuel systems including carburetion, fuel injection and oil injection are studied. Troubleshooting, testing, adjustments, assembly and disassembly are practiced. Proper service procedures discussed and demonstrated. Lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisites: First two semesters of program

Credits: 3

Theory and hands-on lab for all systems in personal watercraft including jet pumps, engines and steering systems. Repair, troubleshooting and service procedures are covered. Lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisites: First two semesters of program

Credits: 3

This course will cover the principles of operation and construction of various components in the electrical systems of a Boat such as Ignition Systems, Starting Systems, Charging Systems, Tilt and Trim Systems, along with other accessories used in the Marine industry .Proper testing, troubleshooting, disassembly/reassembly, and installation of electrical components are also covered.

Credits: 4

This course will cover the principles of operation and construction of various components in the electrical systems of a Boat such as Ignition Systems, Starting Systems, Charging Systems, Tilt and Trim Systems, along with other accessories used in the Marine industry. Proper testing, troubleshooting, disassembly/reassembly, and installation of electrical components are also covered.

Credits: 3

In this course students learn how to diagnose different fuel injec­tion systems & their problems as well as know the difference between fuel systems. Students will be able to analyze these fuel systems along with using the latest test equipment. Each student will be able to understand and explain how these systems work. You will also learn how to use failure evaluating procedures.

Credits: 3

In this course, students learn how to repair a wide variety of advanced fuel systems, for example, throttle body fuel injection, multiport fuel injection systems and direct injected fuel systems. Students practice how to properly test these systems and how to diagnose each one.

Credits: 3

In this course, students learn how to analyze electrical problems and procedures. Students understand how to go about trouble­shooting different electrical problems such as ignition, hard start­ing, low speed engine miss, engine miss firing and engine running rough. Students will also evaluate engine running problems with different computer scanners and be able to apply these skills when they complete this course.

Credits: 6

On-the-job experience at a marine or small engine repair facility as a technician, part and service person, or salesperson. The student is evaluated by the job supervisor and the instructor.

Prerequisites: Completion of first year of program

Credits: 1

This course will provide self-care techniques to promote wellness for the Massage Therapist profession.

Credits: 3

Provides a basic foundation for the courses of study in the Mas­sage Therapy program.

Credits: 2

This course is the study of the nature and causes of disease as related to structure and functions of the body. The massage therapist focus is on maintaining health or a balanced state of physical, emotional, social well-being called homeostasis. The students will be introduced to basic pharmacology terminology with prescriptions medications, recreational drugs, herbs and natural supplements.

Credits: 3

Kinesiology/Anatomy and Movement for Massage Therapy is the study of how Body Movement and its relationship to the muscu­loskeletal system, its mechanical aspects, and the role it plays in the use of this knowledge for the assessment and design of intervention protocols within the scope of Massage Therapy’s practice. This course will include drawing, coloring, and identify­ing muscles and attachments of specific movements on skeletal picture packets and how it effects movement.

Prerequisites: MST 103 – Intro to Swedish Massage and BIO 163 – Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology

Credits: 1

This course includes the modality pertaining to zones and reflex areas in the hands and feet.The students will study how the reflexes corresponds to distinct parts of the body.

Credits: 3

This course provides the skills and techniques to be used with athletes and individuals with sport injuries. The student will learn protocols for sports event, maintenance, and assessment using advanced techniques in neuromuscular, myofascial, lymphatic and trigger point.

Prerequisites: MST 103 – Intro to Swedish Massage

Credits: 3

This course will provide the skills and techniques to be used with Hydrotherapy, Hot Stone therapy, Arnomatherapy, and Spa Ther­apy. The student will be introduced to the terminology of Asian, Eastern, and Traditional Methods and Bodywork. Students will be able to recognize and locate the major meridians, understand the general characteristics of the five elements, learn the names and qualities of the seven major chakras and recognize the qualities of the three Doshas.

Prerequisites: MST 103 – Intro to Swedish Massage

Credits: 3

This course is designed to expand on skills developed in the course Introduction to Swedish Massage. Students will pair up and the classes will consist of hands on applications of body mas­sage techniques.

Credits: 2

Students will learn skills and techniques to adapt massage therapy to the needs of special populations including clients over 55, clients who are obese, clients who are children, pregnancy and infant, end of life, and clients with disabilities.

Prerequisites: MST 103 – Intro to Swedish Massage and BIO 163 – Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology

Credits: 1

This course is an introduction to business practices for the massage therapist as an independent contractor and as an employee.  Students will be introduced to business structures, professional organizations, business plans, bookkeeping, legal records, marketing, professional insurance, financing, and business law.

Credits: 1

The course provides professional massage techniques of the head, neck, shoulders, arms, back and hips of a client seated in a special designed chair for massage. The student will be trained to do a highly visible branch of professional massage, which is done in shopping malls, airports, convention centers, supermarkets, and the workplace.

Credits: 3

This course is designed to expand on skills developed in Swedish and Intermediate Massage. Students will integrate new techniques including trigger point therapy, myofascial massage, polarity, and shiatsu in client-centered treatment planning.

Credits: 1

This course assists students to understand and apply the Stan­dards of Practice established by professional massage organiza­tions. The course emphasizes ethical behavior in the massage therapy profession and teaches students to establish professional boundaries and acceptable standards of documentation.

Credits: 1

This course is designed for classroom lab supervised practical experiences in body massages application. The students will set up appointments for outside individuals to apply techniques for full body massages.

Credits: 1

Private applied instruction that provides students the opportunity to develop and refine performing skills.

Credits: 1

Instruction on piano keyboard in a classroom setting. No previous study is required for enrollment in this entry-level course.Pianos are provided for practice and performance.

Credits: 1

Private applied instruction that provides students the opportunity to develop and refine performing skills on this instrument.

Credits: 1

Private applied instruction that provides students the opportunity to develop and refine performing skills on this instrument.

Credits: 1

Private applied instruction that provides students the opportunity to develop and refine performing skills on a stringed instrument.

Credits: 1

Private applied instruction that provides students the opportunity to develop and refine performing skills on this instrument.

Credits: 1

Private applied instruction that provides students the opportunity to develop and refine performing skills on this instrument.

Credits: 1

Private applied instruction that provides students the opportunity to develop and refine performing skills on this instrument.

Credits: 1

Private applied instruction that provides students the opportunity to develop and refine performing skills on this instrument.

Credits: 1

Private applied instruction that provides students the opportunity to develop and refine performing skills on this instrument.

Credits: 1

Private applied instruction that provides students the opportunity to develop and refine performing skills on this instrument.

Credits: 1

Private applied instruction that provides students the opportunity to develop and refine performing skills on this instrument.

Credits: 1

Private applied instruction that provides students the opportunity to develop and refine performing skills on this instrument.

Credits: 1

Private applied instruction that provides students the opportunity to develop and refine performing skills on this instrument.

Credits: 1

Private applied instruction that provides students the opportunity to develop and refine performing skills on this instrument.

Credits: 1

Private applied instruction that provides students the opportunity to develop and refine performing skills on this instrument.

Credits: 3

Studies the elements and history of music with concentration on critical listening skills. Includes a review of music history; styles; genres; form and content; schools of composers; and social and historical events of the past and present that influence music selections.

Credits: 3

An introduction to the fundamental principles of traditional music, including melody, rhythm, and harmony. Emphasis is on music reading and application to performance. This course will help students prepare for Music Theory I.

Credits: 3

Studies the fundamental principles of traditional theory including melody, rhythm and harmony. Key signatures, intervals and triads are also included. This is an entry level course for music majors.

Credits: 3

Continuation of MUS 120 which includes diatonic material, cadenc­es, chord progression, inversions, chord spelling and part writing.

Credits: 1

Introduces the solfeggio system of music reading. Both tonal and rhythmic patterns are included in the sight reading exercises as well as principles of key relationships, intervals and triads.

Credits: 1

Continuation of principles of key relationships, intervals, triads and improvement of sight reading musical notation. All aspects of rhythmic and melodic structure are studied and practiced.

Credits: 1

Provides an opportunity for talented singers to rehearse and per­form choral music of many styles. There is no required audition.

Credits: 1

A music ensemble which studies, rehearses and performs litera­ture for bands and wind ensembles. There is no required audi­tions.

Credits: 1

An activity designed to give students the opportunity to experi­ence one of the many facets of college life through performance college events.

Credits: 1

Jazz Singers are the college vocal jazz choir. This group provides an opportunity for talented singers to rehearse and perform the close harmonies of vocal jazz repertoire. Auditions are held at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters.

Credits: 1

Rehearsal and performance of selected men’s chorus selections with concerts and special occasion performances. Open audi­tions. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: 1

Rehearsal and performance of selected women’s chorus selec­tions with concerts and special occasion performances. Open auditions. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: 1

Rehearsal and performance of jazz combo literature, with an emphasis on improvisation through the jazz combo or small group ensemble.

Credits: 1

Rehearsal and performance of jazz literature, with an annual tour, concerts and special occasion performances. Open auditions.

Credits: 1

Rehearsal and performance of selected woodwind ensemble works with concerts and special occasion performances. Open auditions. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: 1

Rehearsal and performance of selected brass ensemble works with concerts and special occasion performances. Open auditions. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: 1

Rehearsal and performance of selected percussion works with concerts and special occasion performances. Open auditions. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: 1

Ensemble rehearsal of a wide variety of handbell music and study of the techniques of proper handbell ringing. Auditions are held at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters.

Credits: 1

Teaches improvisation through various musical styles through combo or small group ensemble. Teaches students the art of instant composition.

Credits: 3

History of American Music examines musical development in the United States. This course will study the elements and history of American music with concentration on critical listening skills. Includes a review of American music history, styles, genres, form and content, schools of composers and social and historical events of the past and present that influence music selections. Styles include fine art music, popular styles, jazz, blues, country, musical theatre and rock.

Credits: 3

Studies the elements and history of jazz music with concentration on critical listening skills. Includes a review of jazz history, styles, genres, form and content, composers, and social and historical events of the past and present that influence music selections.

Credits: 3

Continuation of MUS 121 including the study of advanced triadic structure and synthetic scales. Emphasis on analysis.

Credits: 3

Continuation of Music Harmony principles from Music Theory III, including all modulations, form and analysis, Augmented 6th chords, Neapolitan chords, mode mixture, and 19th & 20th century music.

Credits: 1

Continuation of principles of key relationships, intervals, triads and improvement of sight reading musical notation. All aspects of rhythmic and melodic structure are studied and practiced.

Prerequisites: MUS 136 – Music Theory Lab II

Credits: 1

Continuation of principles of key relationships, intervals, triads and improvement of sight reading musical notations. All aspects of rhythmic and melodic structure are studied and practiced.

Prerequisites: MUS 235 – Music Theory Lab III

Credits: 1

Production of a musical play; special attention will be given to singing, acting, set work, props, sound reinforcement, and lighting.  Auditions for speaking and singing roles will be announced in advance. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: 3

Student will learn how to prepare and evaluate system specifications, troubleshoot minor hardware problems, configure and install hardware, manage memory, maintain and optimize operating systems, and use diagnostic software.

Credits: 4

Foundational training in local area networking technology serving as a general introduction to LANs, WANs and the internet. Topics include IQRs, network interface cards (NIC), cabling (coax, STP, UTP and fiber), ARCNET, network protocols, hubs, routers and bridges.

Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide students with the background necessary to understand the local area networking information in Microsoft courses on workstations and networking. This course provides students with the information needed to build a foundation in current networking technology for local area networks, wide area networks, and the Internet.

Credits: 3

This course is an overview of major automotive parts systems, the reading of parts lists, catalogs, price sheets and exploded views will be covered. Identification of manufacturer and their products. Students will gain hands-on experience in cataloging parts. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 4

This course develops skills in the operation of a parts store or automotive dealership parts department. Emphasis is on jobber catalogs, use of computer cataloging, invoice processing, and parts sales. Students learn to handle purchase orders, repair requests, and monthly statements. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 3

A study of various inventory control systems used by the aftermar­ket industry. Emphasis is on the use of state-of-the-art computer inventory system. Students learn to check inventory, determine slow moving stock, ordering new stock, and arrangement of stock. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 1

This is an introductory course designed to provide the physical fitness basic skills to assist students in their preparation for the minimum physical fitness requirements in Criminal Justice field.

Credits: 1

Develops an individual wellness program with emphasis on car­diovascular and muscular fitness and provides the student with periodic fitness evaluations.

Credits: 1

Lecture and laboratory course designed to cover the basic prin­ciples and skill techniques involved in weight training.

Credits: 1

This course is a continuation of PEA 143. This course will continue to provide the physical fitness skills needed to assist the student in their preparation for the minimum physical fitness requirements in the Criminal Justice field.

Credits: 1

Continuation of PEA 146.

Credits: 1

Lecture and laboratory course designed to increase knowledge, understanding and skill techniques involved in weight training. Continuation of PEA 187.

Credits: 1

This course is a continuation of PEA 244. This course will contin­ue to provide the physical fitness skills needed to assist students in their preparation for the minimum physical fitness requirements in the Criminal Justice field.

Credits: 1

Lecture and laboratory course designed to cover the advanced principles and skill techniques involved in weight training. Continuation of PEA 287.

Credits: 3

This four-part course includes coaching theory, sports medicine, sports psychology and sports physiology. It leads to coaching authorization for the State of Iowa as a junior high or senior high coach.

Credits: 1

This course provides an overview of the coaching profession with an in depth look at coaching ethics.

Credits: 1

An exploration of normal characteristics and physical, social, and emotional development of individuals from early childhood through adolescence. This course includes a discussion of athletic development from later childhood through adolescence.

Credits: 1

This class presents an overview study of anatomy and physiology. The relationship between body structure and function forms the basis for the course.

Credits: 2

This course provides a knowledge and understanding of the preven­tion, care and rehabilitation of athletic injuries.

Credits: 3

This course provides basic recognition, prevention, care and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Evaluation of protective devices, and conditioning are included.

Credits: 3

Study of the physical, mental and social dynamics of health with attention to the development of wholesome attitudes and living habits. Students learn basic information, making choices, and ap­plication of steps toward establishing a healthier lifestyle.

Credits: 2

Basic lifesaving techniques and CPR as outlined by the American Red Cross.

Credits: 3

Living a healthy lifestyle, a basic overview of fitness activities, the health benefits of fitness activities, nutrition and stress. Each unit contains basic information, choices and application toward estab­lishing a healthier lifestyle.

Credits: 3

Introduction to the history and development of athletic training as a medical profession. Introduction to methods of athletic training including injury recognition, the prevention and care of athletic injuries and emergency care are studied. Competencies in taping and wrapping techniques are included.

Credits: 2

Introduction to Taping is an entry level class that will introduce the student to the taping and bracing concepts and skills of the athletic training profession and blood borne pathogen procedures. The class will survey common injuries and conditions in athletics and the taping, wrapping and bracing techniques utilized to care for them.

Credits: 1

Supervised athletic event and practice coverage with the purpose of utilizing learned skills and becoming familiar with the working conditions of a certified athletic trainer. P/Q grading.

Credits: 1

This course gives students exposure to the general working conditions and various environments the certified athletic trainer is accustomed to working. P/Q grading.

Prerequisites: PET 140 – Athletic Training Practicum I

Credits: 1

This course gives students exposure to general working conditions of the athletic trainer in a professional environment. P/Q grading.

Prerequisites: PET 150 – Athletic Training Practicum II

 

Credits: 1

This course gives students exposure to the general working conditions of the Certified Athletic Trainer.  Experiences will include a variety of locations and exposure to sports medicine information management and administrative duties of the Athletic Trainer.  Course will include an immersion period with a single sport and responsibilities specific to that sport. P/Q grading.

Prerequisites: PET 171 – Athletic Training Practicum III

Credits: 1

This course is the study of basic and advanced fundamentals of baseball.

Credits: 1

This course is the study of basic and advanced fundamentals, as well as participation in intercollegiate baseball.

Credits: 1

This course is the study of the basic and advanced fundamentals, as well as participation in intercollegiate basketball.

Credits: 1

This course is the study of basic and advanced fundamentals, as well as participa­tion in intercollegiate basketball.

Credits: 1

This course is the study of basic and advanced fundamentals, as well as participation in intercollegiate golf.

Credits: 1

This course is the study of basic and advanced fundamentals, as well as participation in intercollegiate softball.

Credits: 1

This course is the study of basic and advanced fundamentals, as well as participation in intercollegiate swimming.

Credits: 1

This course is the study of basic and advanced fundamentals, as well as participation in intercollegiate volleyball.

Credits: 1

This course is the study of basic and advanced fundamentals, as well as participation in intercollegiate baseball.

Credits: 1

This course is the study of basic and advanced fundamentals, as well as participation in intercollegiate basketball.

Credits: 1

This course is the study of basic and advanced fundamentals, as well as participation in intercollegiate basketball.

Credits: 1

This course is the study of basic and advanced fundamentals, as well as participation in intercollegiate golf.

Credits: 1

This course is the study of basic and advanced fundamentals, as well as participation in intercollegiate softball.

Credits: 1

This course is the study of basic and advanced fundamentals, as well as participation in intercollegiate volleyball.

Credits: 3

Considers broad fundamental ideas about knowledge, the nature of reality, human nature and society. It is also concerned with words and concepts, their meaning and their logical relationship to each other.

Credits: 3

This introductory course examines contemporary ethical conflicts and provides an understanding of the language, concepts and traditions of ethics.

Credits: 4

A survey of the basic concepts of astronomy and physics, recom­mended for students who have not had high school physics. Lecture, demonstration and laboratory.

Credits: 3

Studies the latest astronomical discoveries and astrophysical theories.

Credits: 4

Introduction to meteorological concepts with emphasis on the characteristics and composition of the atmosphere, weather observations, atmospheric stability and circulation, atmospheric storms, climatology and meteorological applications. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 3

Surveys the basic concepts of chemistry, geology and meteorol­ogy. Same as the lecture portion of PHS 187.

Credits: 4

Surveys the basic concepts of chemistry, geology and meteorol­ogy. This course is recommended for students who have not had high school chemistry. Lecture, demonstrations and laboratory.

Credits: 4

Demonstrations, lectures, recitations and laboratory work begin­ning a two semester sequence covering the subject. Mechanics is primarily covered during the first semester. Recommended for pre-medical, dental, pharmacy and for liberal arts student inter­ested in the sciences.

Prerequisites: An elementary understanding of algebra, trigonometry and geometry from high school

Credits: 4

Continuation of PHY 162. Thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism are covered in this semester. Lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisites: PHY 162 – College Physics I

Credits: 5

Demonstrations, lectures recitations and laboratory work begin­ning a two-semester sequence covering the subject. Mechanics is primarily covered in the first semester. Recommended for those planning to major in engineering, physics, chemistry and math­ematics.

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment or previous course in calculus

Credits: 5

Continuation of PHY 212. Thermodynamics and electricity and magnetism are covered in this course. Lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisites: PHY 212 – Classical Physics I

Credits: 7

Practical Nursing Concepts I is a class/lab/clinical course that in­troduces the role of the practical nurse considering history, trends, and comportment through a caring perspective. The role of the licensed practical nurse will be discussed related to safety, legal implications, and collaborative practice throughout the lifespan. The student will be introduced to the nursing process and healthy lifestyles related to physical assessment. The conceptual focus includes safety, communication, infection control, hygiene, skin integrity, elimination, oxygen principles, fluids, nutrition, mobility/ immobility, comfort, and mental health alterations. The student will practice and perform nursing skills in the lab and clinical setting while caring for client conditions.

Credits: 8

Practical Nursing Concepts II is a class/lab/clinical course that builds upon concepts related to human needs utilizing the nursing process. The student will demonstrate caring behaviors while learning about physiologic adaptations related to perioperative, acid-base balance, fluid and electrolyte, elimination, sensory, oxygenation/perfusion, mobility, stress, metabolic and protective alterations as related to the medical-surgical client throughout the lifespan.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of first semester PN courses (C or better)

Credits: 6

Practical Nursing Concepts III class/preceptorship course that prepares the student for entry-level nursing practice by focusing on nursing judgment, legal/ethical issues and assimilation into the discipline of nursing. Concepts of leadership, management, and professional development, as well as maternal newborn nursing will be taught. Emphasis is on the role of the nurse as the provid­er and coordinator of care with simple to complex client conditions throughout the lifespan, including the child-bearing families. Management of simple to complex human needs including: oxygen­ation, perfusion, intracranial regulation, mobility, and inflammation/ infection/immunity.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of second semester PN courses (C or better)

Credits: 1

PN Pharmacology I is a class/lab course that introduces pharma­cological concepts and classifications. Medication administration including oral, parenteral, enteral, and intravenous therapy main­tenance will be discussed and applied.

Credits: 2

PN Pharmacology II is a course that builds upon pharmacologi­cal concepts presented in PN Pharmacology I focusing on the classification, mechanism of action of the medications and nursing process as it relates to the client/patient condition.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of first semester PN courses (C or better)

Credits: 3

A general introductory course in the fundamental concepts, institu­tions, principles and procedures of political science. Background in classical political theory through exposure to ideas of past politi­cal philosophers (such as Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Marx and others).Studies comparative systems through consid­eration of governments of Great Britain, France and Canada.

Credits: 3

Review of basic fundamentals of government including federalism, the political process, the presidency, the congress and the judicial system.

Credits: 3

This course provides an introduction to politics, government, and public policy at the state and local level, with particular emphasis on the state of Iowa. It includes an analysis of the relationship among federal, state, and local governments; the structure and powers of state and local governments; the scope of political participation in state and local parties; and public policy-making by state and local governments.

Credits: 3

Study of elements of national power and the formulation of foreign policy. Examination of national, state and international politics from 1871 to the present, including international organization, law and future prospects.

Credits: 3

Survey of the methods, ideologies and main ideas in the field of comparative politics. Introduction to comparative research. Study and comparison of governments and institutions across nation-states.

Credits: 3

An introduction to the scientific study of behavior; a brief history of psychology as a science, and topics fundamental to human behavior including developmental issues, sensory abilities, cogni­tive performance, social and emotional factors in behavior, and abnormal behavior and therapies.

Credits: 3

Studies human development from conception through the lifes­pan. Physical, emotional, social, cognitive and moral aspects are studied in the classroom, by lecture, file/video, projects, and observation and by reading the literature.

Credits: 3

Increases student’s knowledge and experiences relating to vari­ous populations with disabilities. Adjustment to physical and/ or mental disability, conflicting treatment models, impact on self, family, community and society are examined.

Credits: 3

This course is design for students to analyze psychological development of the child in relation to the biological, physical, and sociological antecedent conditions from prenatal to adolescent stages. Emphasis on contemporary theories of child psychology, including: physical growth and development, personality and social learning, cognition and perception, and language development.

Prerequisites: PSY 111 – Intro to Psychology or PSY 121 – Developmental Psychology

Credits: 3

This course deals with the interplay of biological factors, human interactions, cultural forces, and social structures which shape the growing child from conception to adolescence.

Credits: 3

This course explores the rapid physical, social, emotional, and cognitive changes of adolescents. Students distinguish myths about adolescence from research findings and examine the importance of cultural and historical factors in the crucial transition from childhood to adulthood.

Prerequisites: PSY 111 – Intro to Psychology or permission of the instructor

Credits: 3

A survey course tracing history, models and symptoms of psychiatric disorders. Uses the current DSM-5 (diagnostic and statistical manual) as a standard of abnormal behavior.

Credits: 3

Explores social interaction from both the psychological and socio­logical perspectives. It is the study of how we think about, relate to, and interact with each other.

Credits: 3

Human Sexuality focuses on normal sexual development, human sexual responses, and common sexual problems. It provides factual information on human sexuality and raises practical questions about human sexual behavior. It also helps students examine and evalu­ate their views and values concerning sexual behavior.

Prerequisites:  Students must have taken one of the following three courses: PSY 111 – Intro to Psychology, SOC 110 – Intro to Sociology, or SOC 120 – Marriage and Family or have permission of instructor.

Credits: 3

This course is designed for individuals who are or will be working in a vocational environment, which requires them to provide or become part of an educational or training program.  Although the course is targeting traditional educational systems, it is directly applicable to virtually any setting in which a person may be required to help an individual or group of individuals learn and understand new information, or to develop new knowledge and skills sets. The fundamentals of this course are designed to assist the student in differentiating learning theory and processes as aspects of human development. Emphasis is placed on the roles of the educators and the students in applying the principles of learning, instruction, evaluation, and pupil management.

Credits: 1

Individualized reading skill development designed to improve comprehension, vocabulary and reading rate.

Grading: P/Q

Credits: 1

An individualized elective course in reading.

Grading: P/Q

Prerequisites: RDG 031 – Intro to College Reading II or an acceptable assessment score

 

Credits: 3

A survey of the major religions of the eastern and western world. Each is placed in its historical context, and its major tenets are explored. Goals include a general understanding of the various religions studied, some specific insights into each religion’s belief structures and discussion of the general function of religion in hu­man experience.

Credits: 4

Students learn independent, adult living skills, such as good peer relations, using community resources, exploration of interests/hobbies, meal planning, and daily living activities.

Credits: 3

This enrichment course will examine concerns faced by students as a member of modern society. It is designed to assist students in making sound decisions concerning physical, mental, and finan­cial health, and to use non-working hours in a creative way. Criti­cal thinking skills will be emphasized as students analyze written documents, including those financial, legal, and medical. Credit earned will not satisfy requirements for an Associate’s Degree.

Credits: 1

A human development seminar designed to help individual stu­dents increase their academic potential. Behavioral modification techniques are used. The effort is to help the student’s behavior become consistent with the student’s stated intentions concerning academic work. Access to this course is by referral.

Credits: 1

Students master the academic and personal skills needed to suc­ceed in higher education and in life. Content will cover academic, communication and life management skills. Goal setting, time management, note taking, test taking and how to be a lifelong learner will also be covered.

Credits: 1

This course acquaints students with formation and services found in a library and shows how to use that information. Documentation of sources, plagiarism, and copyright information is included in this course.

Grading
P/Q

Credits: 1

This course is designed to assist students in obtaining and maintaining employment. Topics include making career decisions, using labor market information, developing a portfolio, and dem­onstrating positive attitudes and behaviors.

Credits: 2

Students learn about themselves, theories about career, and re­sources available to assist in the career exploration and decision-making process.

Credits: 2

Career Exploration II is a continuation of Career Exploration I. This course will provide students with an opportunity to gain further knowledge about the many different types of careers available. Students will explore career outlook information, educational require­ments, job descriptions and essential job search communications. Students will compile documents to create their personal portfolio.

Credits: 1

This course helps students expand on mastering intellectual and self-aptitude skills through brain game activities and other exer­cises that will increase life-long learning and improve brain health and performance.

Credits: 2

Introduction to Reasoning is a course that provides students with an opportunity to gain knowledge and skills to help one improve their own behavior as well as the behavior of others. It allows students to gain reasoning, critical thinking, and problem solving skills as well as how to influence others.

Credits: 3

This course furthers the understanding of the interrelationships among individuals, the college, the family, work, and society. Develops leadership, study habits, communication skills and deci­sion making abilities, especially in education and career areas. Students consider learning as a process.

Credits: 2

This course is a structured group experience based on the assumption that many things are right for you.  The course is designed to help you realize your own unique potential so that you can lead a more successful and satisfying life.  This is accomplished by positive-oriented experiences that help you clarify personal values, set goals, and recognize strengths in yourself and others.

Credits: 2

This course shares techniques to identify, prevent, resolve, and manage conflict.

Credits: 3

This course provides an introduction to the study of topics related to happiness and the positive aspects of human experience and wellness. The first part of the course will focus on the basic areas of research in positive psychology and the ways to apply the re­search to your own life. The second part of the class will focus on personal wellness and self-care.

Credits: 1

The course encourages academic excellence by providing social, recreational, educational, and cultural activities.

Credits: 2

Students will be given the opportunity to apply real world situations to hands-on learning and evaluate their experience and observations. Social skills required in various occupational settings will be developed, emphasizing how appropriate personal attitudes lead to business success.

Credits: 1

Students will learn employability skills while developing professional and leadership skills.  Students will create a professional portfolio, resume, and demonstrate interview skills while reviewing how to maintain their professional credential following graduation.

Credits: 1

Offers an opportunity to explore professional and technical as­pects within an organization and to reflect on the experience.

Credits: 3

Introduction to Sustainable Energy Resources is designed to provide a basic understanding of energy, current trends in energy consumption, and the role of sustainable energy resources in today’s society. Topics covered will include matter and energy laws, the history of energy usage by humans, the categories of energy resources, and the environmental problems currently be­ing caused by energy consumption.

Credits: 1

Fundamentals, principles, and practices involved in producing and reading blueprints utilized in the different sectors of the renewable energy industry with a focus on basic blueprint reading.

Credits: 1

A study of the careers available within the renewable energy sec­tor, with an emphasis on analyzing renewable energy industries as related components of a dynamic system. Students will also learn about drafting cover letters, creating resumes, interviewing, and networking.

Credits: 1

This course presents the skills required to organize and prepare an estimate for a trade’s project.

Credits: 1

A study of principles and practices used to establish a safe and ef­ficient environment for personnel in the renewable energy industry and various sectors thereof. The course focuses on general indus­trial safety, safety and health regulatory agencies and organiza­tions, hazard recognition and correction, and first aid.

Credits: 3

Maintenance and Repair of Pumps and Valves is designed to pro­vide the student with a basic understanding of the types of pumps and valves used in water processing and wastewater treatment facilities. Topics covered will include the principles of pump and valve usage, the types of pumps and valves found in water pro­cessing and wastewater treatment facilities, and pump and valve inspection, maintenance and repair.

Credits: 3

Social media surrounds us every minute of every day and even though students may be experts on how to use a variety of these platforms for socialization, their knowledge of utilizing social me­dia in a professional, work-related environment may be lacking. In addition to introducing students to several popular social media sites, this course emphasizes how to use social media platforms to successfully communicate and promote a message in support of a business and/or product. Special attention will be paid to when this type of transmission is most effective, how to select the most effect social media outlet for your particular target demo­graphic and how to measure success of the platform chosen and message.

Credits: 3

This course takes a more in-depth look at writing, specifically for the web. Because the web is a primary “go-to” platform for a number of people, the information presented must not only be credible but also attractive with a goal in mind of the creator.

Credits: 3

This course will explore the collection, reporting, and analysis of website data. Web analytics will focus on analyzing the effectiveness of organizations’ marketing and advertising goals by identifying and reviewing the methods used to measure effectiveness. The student will analyze data through mathematical formulas to determine the success of failure of the goals. Students will look at all forms of web communications including social media, mobile, and websites.

Credits: 3

A survey course applying basic sociological concepts, theories, and methods to examine society, culture, cultural institutions, cultural diversity, and cultural stability and change.

Credits: 3

Applies basic scientific sociological concepts and principles to the examination of contemporary social issues such as crime, poverty, violence, and inequality.

Credits: 3

The sociological study of the family and family-related issues in cultural, cross-cultural, historical, and social context.

Credits: 3

An introductory course in social welfare systems and social work practice that surveys the historical development of the social work profession in conjunction with the development of the social wel­fare services in the United States.

Credits: 3

A survey course to identify and analyze the variety and extent of global economic, political, social and cultural problems and is­sues.

Credits: 3

Survey of the contributions that various minorities have made to the development of the United States.

Credits: 3

Discusses the psychological and societal changes and needs of the elderly. Emphasis is on the effect of, and adaptation to, role changes such as retirement and institutionalization. It also deals with perspectives on adult development in the areas of emotional, cognitive and personality development. Grief, dying, and death, the final stages of the life process are examined from varying points of view.

Credits: 3

The fundamentals course develops the basic skills involved in a variety of communication situations, including oral presentations and interpersonal speaking.  Emphasis is placed on organization, audience analysis, vocal and physical delivery, listening, nonverbal communication, critical thinking, and methods of dealing with communication apprehension through class discussion and activities.

Credits: 3

This course examines both the theoretical and practical basis of speech communication, particularly public speaking. Emphasis is placed on speech preparation, organization, support, delivery, and audience analysis.

Credits: 3

Examines how humans communicate in one-on-one situations through personal and professional relationships.

Credits: 2

This course intends to introduce the student to the practice of sur­gical patient care. Preoperative and postoperative routines as well as some of the responsibilities of the surgical technologist in the circulating role are discussed. The bio-psycho-social needs of the patient are addressed in addition to patient identification, review of the chart, documentation, surgical transport and positioning, skin preparation, urinary catheterization, specimen care, wound clas­sification, vital signs, hemo-dynamics, monitoring, and discharge planning. The student will learn appropriate response to legal, ethical, and moral issues, as well as emergency situations and personnel safety practices as outlined by OSHA Standards.

Credits: 6

This course provides the student with an orientation to the surgi­cal technology profession and operating room theory. Principles and concepts associated with the professional aspects of surgical technology are presented. Foundational concepts such as the role of the surgical technologist, professional aspects, and medi­cal law will be covered .A theoretical overview will be given for introduction into: the surgical environment, biomedical sciences, aseptic techniques, sterilization and disinfection, instrumentation, equipment and supplies, wound healing and diagnostic proce­dures.

Prerequisites: BIO 163 – Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology or BIO 168/BIO 173 – Human Anatomy & Physiology I & II, HSC 114 – Medical Terminology

Corequisites: SUR 131 – Surgical Foundations Lab

Credits: 4

This course provides the student with an orientation to the surgical technology profession and operating room theory. Principles and concepts associated with the professional aspects of surgical technology are presented. Foundational concepts such as the role of the surgical technologist, professional aspects, and medical law will be covered.  A theoretical overview will be given for introduction into: the surgical environment, biomedical sciences, aseptic techniques, sterilization and disinfection, instrumentation, equipment and supplies, wound healing and diagnostic
procedures.

Credits: 6

This course provides the student with the preoperative theory, procedural anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, diagnostic interventions, procedural considerations, instrumentation, and steps related to various surgical specialties. Specialties include: diagnostic, general, obstetrics and gynecology, genitourinary, ear, nose and throat, ophthalmic, plastic, orthopedic, peripheral vascular, cardiovascular, neurosurgery. Students will incorporate safe perioperative patient care techniques, medical terminology, and pharmacology to each procedure.

Credits: 2

This course will allow students to apply principles learned during Surgical Procedures lecture in a hands-on laboratory setting. Students will further redefine skills related to the three phases of case management as they apply to each surgical specialty and its specific cases.

Credits: 2

This course reviews basic math and science skills. It provides an introduction to surgical pharmacology and emphasizes the classifications of medications used in surgery. The student will become familiar with the general terminology used with medica­tion application, the use of drugs in the care of surgical patients, and the principles of anesthesia administration for routine cases and emergency procedures.

Credits: 2

This course includes the correlation of the relationship to the practice of sterile technique and infection control in the operative setting. The student will use the microscope to contrast and com­pare the structure and characteristics of microorganisms.

Credits: 3

This practicum application provides the student the opportunity to apply classroom theory learned in the first and second semesters in a hospital operating room.

Credits: 4

This course provides students the opportunity to attend practi­cum rotations in the various surgical specialties while scrubbing a variety of perioperative cases to build skills required for complex perioperative patient care. Emphasis is placed on improving their technical skills, critical thinking, speed, efficiency, and autonomy in the operative setting. The latter portion of this course provides the student with an opportunity to scrub in specialty areas as the 81 primary surgical technologist. Students will gain expertise in sterile technique, improve their anticipation of surgeon’s needs, and further increase their dexterity and speed. Emphasis is placed on preparing students for transition into the job market.

Credits: 3

This course is designed to introduce the student to the concepts and practical uses of mobile application development. The major objective is to develop a practical approach to learn the fundamentals of mobile application development and learn how they can be applied to other Operating Systems.

Credits: 4

Oxy-acetylene welding in correlation with identification of metals; care and use of welding equipment; selection of rods and fluxes; and safety. Lecture and laboratory. (Formerly WE-111C)

Credits: 3

Ferrous to ferrous, nonferrous to nonferrous hard surfacing used in the welding field today. Lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisites: WEL 121 – Oxy Fuel Welding & Cutting

Credits: 1

This course will provide students with orientation to the welding profession and will cover the basics of safety & health within the welding profession. This course aligns to SENSE Level 1, Module 1 and Module 2 – Key Indicators 1-6.

Credits: 3

Provides instruction in interpreting elements of welding prints (drawings or sketches), focusing on measurement, American Welding Society welding symbols, and fabrication re­quirements. Students will understand how to prepare, assemble and tack welding parts according to drawings or sketches, using proper materials and tools. This course aligns to SENSE Level 1 Module 3: Drawing and Welding Symbol Interpretation, Key Indicators 1 and 2.

Credits: 2

Focuses on proper weld safety, machine setup and welding techniques of Gas Metal Arc Welding Short-Circuiting Transfer. Students perform American Welding Society compliant welds on carbon steel, in flat, horizontal, vertical and overhead positions. This course will prepare students to take an AWS welder certifica­tion test, which is recommended. This course aligns with SENSE Level 1 Module 5 Key Indicators 1-7.

Credits: 2

Focuses on proper weld safety, machine setup and welding tech­niques of Gas Metal Arc Welding Spray Transfer. Students per­form American Welding Society compliant welds on carbon steel in flat and horizontal positions. This course will prepare students to take an AWS welder certification test, which is recommended for its successful completion. It aligns with SENSE Level 1 Module 5 Key Indicators 1, 2 and 8-12, as well as Module 2 – Indicator 7, Module 3- Key Indicator 3, and Module 9 – Key Indicator 2.

Credits: 2

Focuses on proper weld safety, machine setup and welding techniques for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. Students perform American Welding Society compliant welds on carbon steel in flat, horizontal, vertical and overhead positions. This course will prepare students to take an AWS welder certification test, which is recommended for successful completion of this course. This course aligns to SENSE Level 1, Module 7 – Key Indicators 1-7, as well as Module 2 – Key Indicator 7, Module 3- Key Indicator 3, and Module 9 – Key Indicator 2.

Credits: 1

Focuses on proper weld safety, machine setup and welding tech­niques for gas tungsten arc welding. Students perform American Welding Society compliant welds on aluminum in flat and horizon­tal positions. This course will prepare students to take an AWS welder certification test, which is recommended for successful completion of this course. This course aligns to SENSE Level I, Module 7 Key Indicators 1, 2 and 13 – 17, as well as Module 2 – Key Indicator 7, Module 3- Key Indicator 3, and Module 9 – Key Indicator 2.

Credits: 1

Focuses on proper weld safety, machine setup and welding tech­niques for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. Students perform American Welding Society compliant welds on austenitic stainless steel in flat, horizontal, and vertical positions. This course will prepare students to take an AWS welder certification test, which is recom­mended for successful completion of this course. This course aligns to SENSE Level I, Module 7 Key Indicators 1, 2 and 8-12 as well as Module 2 – Key Indicator 7, Module 3- Key Indicator 3, and Module 9 – Key Indicator 2.

Credits: 1

Students will visually examine test weldments and thermally cut surfaces per multiple welding codes, standards, and specifica­tions. This course aligns to SENSE Level I, Module 9: Welding Inspection and Testing Principles.

Credits: 3

Focuses on safety, amperage settings, polarity and the proper selection of electrodes for the shielded metal arc welding process. Students will perform American Welding Society compliant welds on carbon steel, using visual and destructive methods for deter­mining weld quality. This course aligns to SENSE Level 1 Module 4 – Key Indicators 1-7 for the flat and horizontal positions, as well as Module 2 – Key Indicator 7, Module 3 – Key Indicator 3, and Module 9 – Key Indicator 2.

Credits: 3

Focuses on safety, amperage settings, polarity and the proper se­lection of electrodes for the Shielded Metal Arc Welding (informal­ly known as stick welding) process. Students perform American Welding Society complaint welds on carbon steel, in vertical up and overhead configurations, using visual and destructive meth­ods for determining weld quality. This course aligns to SENSE Level 1 Module 4: Shielded Metal Arc Welding Key Indicators 1-7 for the flat and horizontal positions, as well as Module 2 – Key Indicator 7, Module 3- Key Indicator 3, and Module 9 – Key Indicator 2.

Credits: 5

Develops the exacting techniques required to properly weld pipe installations. Lecture and Laboratory.

Credits: 2

Principles and applications of gas and MIG welding theory, safety and shop practices are covered. Lecture and laboratory.

Credits: 4

Introduction to Wind Energy students will be exposed to the many facets of the wind industry. This course will cover the history and development of the wind industry, terminology used in the indus­try, basic tools and techniques, wind turbine components, the future of the wind industry, and other topics that are appropriate.

Credits: 4

Field Training I is designed to provide students with an under­standing of the safety techniques used in the wind industry. Topics will include OSHA 10, First Aid/AED, tower climbing, high angle rescue/evacuation, working with tools at height, basic electrical safety, confined spaces, and basic crane safety.

Credits: 4

Field Training II will introduce a wind turbines construction, main­tenance, and operation. Topics will include construction, schemat­ics, components, maintenance, mechanical systems, electrical systems troubleshooting, and operation.

Prerequisites: WTT 116 – Field Training I

Credits: 4

This course will allow students the opportunity to learn the techniques, methodology, and concepts used to develop projects around the world.

Credits: 3

Power Generation and Transmission will serve as an introduction to the generation of electrical power with a wind turbine genera­tor, moving that power through a local transmission system to a substation where a customer will purchase the generated power. This course will cover all aspects of working with components of a high voltage transmission system.

Credits: 4

Students will complete job contact experience in their field of choice. A minimum of 288 job contact hours is required by this 4-credit course.

Credits: 6

Students will complete job contact experience in their field of choice. A minimum of 432 job contact hours is required by this 6-credit course.