Course Electives / Concentration Courses

When electives and/or concentrations courses are required, select from the list below.

Communications

Credits: 3
Emphasis on expository and argumentative writings including a review of usage and mechanics. Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on the ACT, Accuplacer, ASSET,COMPASS as determined by Iowa Lakes policy
Credits: 3

Continuation of ENG 105 with emphasis on research and docu­mentation as well as literary analysis.

Prerequisites: ENG 105 – Composition I


Credits: 1

Students master the academic and personal skills needed to suc­ceed in higher education and in life. Content will cover academic, communication and life management skills. Goal setting, time management, note taking, test taking and how to be a lifelong learner will also be covered.


Credits: 3

The fundamentals course develops the basic skills involved in a variety of communication situations, including oral presentations and interpersonal speaking.  Emphasis is placed on organization, audience analysis, vocal and physical delivery, listening, nonverbal communication, critical thinking, and methods of dealing with communication apprehension through class discussion and activities.


Credits: 3

This course examines both the theoretical and practical basis of speech communication, particularly public speaking. Emphasis is placed on speech preparation, organization, support, delivery, and audience analysis.


Credits: 3

Examines how humans communicate in one-on-one situations through personal and professional relationships.


Mathematics

Credits: 3

This is a general survey course which includes sets; number systems; elementary algebra; exponents; equations and inequalities; fractions; ratios; proportion and variation; probability and statistics; elementary graphing; consumer mathematics; and an introduction to geometry.

Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score


Credits: 3

Operation of real and complex numbers; factoring; exponents; quadratic equations; inequalities; matrices; rational functions; logarithmic functions; and graphing or functions .

Prerequisites: Ap­propriate placement score


Credits: 5

Course combines college algebra and trigonometry .Algebra top-ics covered include functions and their graphs; solving equations and inequalities; polynomial functions; conic sections; and exponential and logarithmic functions .Trigonometry topics covered are right triangle trigonometry; unit circles; trigonometric functions; graphing; verifying identities; solving trigonometric equations; and applications of trigonometry.

Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score


Credits: 3

An applied mathematics course dealing with mathematics related to most academic disciplines .It provides introduction to matrices, linear programming, combinations, permutations, statistics, mathematics of finance.

Prerequisites: MAT 110 – Math for Liberal Arts, MAT 120 – College Algebra, MAT 121 – College Algebra, or MAT 127 – College Algebra and Trig


Credits: 3

This course provides a foundation of statistical concepts and procedures that can aid the student as both a consumer and pro­ducer of statistical information. The course emphasizes descrip­tive and inferential statistical methods, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing and linear regression. Students are introduced to technology as it applies to introductory statistical methods.

Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score


Credits: 4

This course provides a foundation of statistical concepts and pro­cedures that can aid the student as both a consumer and produc­er of statistical information. The course emphasizes descriptive and inferential statistical methods, probability, estimation, hypoth­esis testing and linear regression. Students are also introduced to software as it applies to introductory statistical methods.

Prerequisites
appropriate placement score


Credits: 4

This course provides a foundation of statistical concepts and pro­cedures that can aid the student as both a consumer and produc­er of statistical information. The course emphasizes descriptive and inferential statistical methods, probability, estimation, hypoth­esis testing and linear regression. Students are also introduced to software as it applies to introductory statistical methods.

Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score


Credits: 3

A continuation of BUS 211 or MAT 157. Application of statistics in a business context and use of computer software for statistics.

Prerequisites: BUS 211 – Business Statistics or MAT 157 – Statistics


Credits: 4

This course is the first of a series of three courses. The purpose of the sequence is to provide the student with a foundation in calculus and analytic geometry. Those students enrolled in the science, math, engineering, computer science, and similar fields, will also gain proficiency and develop an understanding how these tools will be used later on in their studies. Topics include analytic geometry, differentiation, and applications of derivation and integration.  Graphing calculator required. 

Prerequisites: MAT 127 – College Algebra and Trig or equivalent


Credits: 5

A general course in differential and integral calculus and its ap­plications. Topics include limits and continuity; differentiation; application of differentiation; integration; logarithmic, exponential and other transcendental functions; and applications of integration.

Prerequisites: MAT 127 – College Algebra and Trig or equivalent


Credits: 5

Continuation of MAT 211. Integration techniques, sequences, infinite series, conic sections, parametric equations, polar coordi­nates, vectors, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, and vector-67 values functions.

Prerequisites: MAT 211 – Calculus I or equivalent


Credits: 3

Continuation of MAT 217. Explores functions of several variables; partial derivatives; directional derivatives and gradients; multiple integration; vector analysis; and a brief look at differential equations.

Prerequisites: MAT 217 – Calculus II or equivalent


Science

Credits: 4

Introduction to all biology, ecology, physiology, and biological prin­ciples. Intended for non-science majors. Lecture and laboratory.


Credits: 4

Introduction to biology concepts with emphasis on ecology, cellu­lar biology, reproduction and development, genetics and evolution. Lecture and laboratory.


Credits: 4

Introduction to biology concepts with emphasis on kingdoms; taxonomy and a survey of invertebrate and vertebrate organisms; plant structures and physiology; and animal systems. Lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 112 – General Biology I


Credits: 4

Basic ecology and environmental concepts, including population studies of the world and how they relate to environmental prob­lems. Lecture and laboratory.


Credits: 4

Structure and function of the human body with emphasis on cells, tissues and all major organ systems. Anatomy and physiology are integrated at the cellular level and at the organ/system level. Lecture and laboratory.


Credits: 4

An advanced study of anatomy and physiology. The relationship between body structure and function and homeostasis forms the basis for the course. Pathological processes that result in dysfunc­tion and disease are presented. Major topics include cell biology, histology, skin, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Lecture and laboratory.


Credits: 4

An advanced study of anatomy and physiology. The relationship between body structure and function and homeostasis forms the basis for the course. Pathological processes that result in dys­function and disease are presented. Major topics include diges­tive, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, immune, blood, metabolism, reproduction, urinary, fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base balance. Lecture and laboratory.


Credits: 4

General microbiology designed for the science major and nurs­ing students. Emphasis on morphology, physiology, microbial genetics, immunology, pathology, epidemiology, and laboratory techniques. Lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO 105 – Introductory Biology, BIO 112 – General Biology I, BIO 163 – Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology, BIO 168 – Human Anatomy & Physiology I,  AGV 118 – Animal Anatomy & Physiology I or higher.


Credits: 4

The first of two general survey courses introducing the student to general, organic and biological chemistry. Topics covered are chemical calculations, atomic structure, nuclear chemistry, periodic relations, gas laws, solid state, solutions, and acids and bases. Lecture and laboratory.


Credits: 4

Continuation of CHM 151. Covers kinetics and equilibrium of chemical reactions as well as acid-base theory. Hydrocarbon naming and reactions are also covered, including alcohols, car­bohydrates, amines, acids, acid derivatives, lipids, amino acids, nucleic acids and proteins, SNA, RNA and metabolism. Lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHM 151 – College Chemistry I


Credits: 5

The properties of matter in terms of modern chemical principles. The topics covered are measurements, stoichiometry, atomic structure, chemical reactions, periodic relationships, gas laws, thermochemistry, quantum theory, solutions and equilibrium and inter-and intra-molecular forces. Problem solving in each of the areas is included. Lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisites: High school chemistry and mathematics


Credits: 5

This course is an introduction to organic chemistry, and covers: acids and bases, oxidation/reduction, solubility products, and nuclear chemistry, kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, coordination complexes, qualitative analysis. Problem solving in each of the areas is included. Microscale and semi-microscale labs are also included.

Prerequisites: CHM 166 – General Chemistry I


Credits: 4

This course covers the basics of chemistry as it relates to the forensic lab. In the course we will cover the basics of evidence collection, clues at the atomic level, and the basics of chemical evidence including DNA evidence. Also covered will be the use of chemistry in explosives, arson investigations, poisoning, and estimating time of death of a victim. Lecture and laboratory.


Credits: 4

A survey of the basic concepts of astronomy and physics, recom­mended for students who have not had high school physics. Lecture, demonstration and laboratory.


Credits: 4

Introduction to meteorological concepts with emphasis on the characteristics and composition of the atmosphere, weather observations, atmospheric stability and circulation, atmospheric storms, climatology and meteorological applications. Lecture and laboratory.


Credits: 4

Surveys the basic concepts of chemistry, geology and meteorol­ogy. This course is recommended for students who have not had high school chemistry. Lecture, demonstrations and laboratory.


Credits: 4

Demonstrations, lectures, recitations and laboratory work begin­ning a two semester sequence covering the subject. Mechanics is primarily covered during the first semester. Recommended for pre-medical, dental, pharmacy and for liberal arts student inter­ested in the sciences.

Prerequisites: An elementary understanding of algebra, trigonometry and geometry from high school


Credits: 4

Continuation of PHY 162. Thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism are covered in this semester. Lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisites: PHY 162 – College Physics I


Credits: 5

Demonstrations, lectures recitations and laboratory work begin­ning a two-semester sequence covering the subject. Mechanics is primarily covered in the first semester. Recommended for those planning to major in engineering, physics, chemistry and math­ematics.

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment or previous course in calculus


Credits: 5

Continuation of PHY 212. Thermodynamics and electricity and magnetism are covered in this course. Lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisites: PHY 212 – Classical Physics I


Humanities

Credits: 3

Introduces drama as a separate literary form as approached his­torically from Greek drama to the present, including both classic and contemporary drama.


Credits: 3

Teaches the criteria for choosing the best children’s literature and applies that criteria to evaluating materials to be used in the classroom.


Credits: 3

An introduction to the study of short fiction, poetry, and drama.


Credits: 3

Explores major American writers (including Native Americans) and their contributions to American letters from Puritan times to 1865.


Credits: 3

Explores major American writers and their contributions to Ameri­can letters from the post-Civil War era through modern periods.


Credits: 3

Literature from the Ancients, classical Greece and the Renaissance.


Credits: 3

Evolution of the short story as a literary form, with emphasis on analysis and appreciation.


Credits: 3

This course is designed to help adults who work with young adults become more familiar with teens and their literature, and select the best literature available based upon criteria and sources that allow for the selection of the best literature for young adults.


Credits: 3

Studies the elements and history of music with concentration on critical listening skills. Includes a review of music history; styles; genres; form and content; schools of composers; and social and historical events of the past and present that influence music selections.


Credits: 3

History of American Music examines musical development in the United States. This course will study the elements and history of American music with concentration on critical listening skills. Includes a review of American music history, styles, genres, form and content, schools of composers and social and historical events of the past and present that influence music selections. Styles include fine art music, popular styles, jazz, blues, country, musical theatre and rock.


Credits: 3

Studies the elements and history of jazz music with concentration on critical listening skills. Includes a review of jazz history, styles, genres, form and content, composers, and social and historical events of the past and present that influence music selections.


Credits: 3

Introduces art as a visual language, along with the methods and materials used. A brief art survey is also included, with the intent of helping the student become more informed about the visual arts.


Credits: 3

Considers broad fundamental ideas about knowledge, the nature of reality, human nature and society. It is also concerned with words and concepts, their meaning and their logical relationship to each other.


Credits: 3

This introductory course examines contemporary ethical conflicts and provides an understanding of the language, concepts and traditions of ethics.


Credits: 3

A survey of the major religions of the eastern and western world. Each is placed in its historical context, and its major tenets are explored. Goals include a general understanding of the various religions studied, some specific insights into each religion’s belief structures and discussion of the general function of religion in hu­man experience.


Credits: 4

Introductory course for those with no prior background. Students become acquainted with the sounds and structure of French emphasizing useful vocabulary and development of basic conversational skills.


Credits: 4

Progressive development of French language skills with additional emphasis on reading.

Prerequisites: FLF 141 – Elementary French I


Credits: 2

This course is designed to provide non-Spanish speaking profes­sionals with functional skills in Spanish. Spanish phrases, com­mands and questions practical to education are covered. No prior knowledge of Spanish necessary.


Credits: 4

Introduction to the Spanish language and culture; practice in all the basic skills.


Credits: 4

This course aims to continue development of functional proficiency in Spanish through listening, speaking, reading and writing to, and with others. Students will expand their ability to communicate in Spanish in everyday, practical situations.

Prerequisites: FLS 141 – Elementary Spanish I


Credits: 4

Review and expansion of grammar, selected reading and further practice in oral and written communication.

Prerequisites: FLS 142 – Elementary Spanish II


Credits: 4

FLS 242 Intermediate Spanish II provides a course to develop an increasingly complex oral and written comprehension of the Spanish language, while further developing their fluency in writing, speaking, listening, and reading the language.

Prerequisites: FLS 241 – Intermediate Spanish I


Credits: 3

Surveys the origins of human civilization in the Near East, the great rise of Greece and Rome and concludes with the Enlighten­ment.


Credits: 3

Examines an extremely dynamic phase of European and world history.


Credits: 3

An introductory course that studies mass media and society. The class includes a historical and contemporary overview of indus­tries, professions, processes and social effects of the mass media.


Credits: 3

A survey course to identify and analyze the variety and extent of global economic, political, social and cultural problems and is­sues.


Social Science

Credits: 3

Surveys the origins of human civilization in the Near East, the great rise of Greece and Rome and concludes with the Enlighten­ment.


Credits: 3

Examines an extremely dynamic phase of European and world history.


Credits: 3

Study of national foundations, colonial background, revolution, confederation and institutions; nationalism and expansion. The growth of democracy and war plus reconstruction are analyzed.


Credits: 3

Covers re-union growth of big business, expansion and World War I, rise to world power, isolation, modern industry, depression, recovery and internationalism.


Credits: 3

An introduction to the scientific study of behavior; a brief history of psychology as a science, and topics fundamental to human behavior including developmental issues, sensory abilities, cogni­tive performance, social and emotional factors in behavior, and abnormal behavior and therapies.


Credits: 3

Studies human development from conception through the lifes­pan. Physical, emotional, social, cognitive and moral aspects are studied in the classroom, by lecture, file/video, projects, and observation and by reading the literature.


Credits: 3

Increases student’s knowledge and experiences relating to vari­ous populations with disabilities. Adjustment to physical and/ or mental disability, conflicting treatment models, impact on self, family, community and society are examined.


Credits: 3

A survey course tracing history, models and symptoms of psychiatric disorders. Uses the current DSM-5 (diagnostic and statistical manual) as a standard of abnormal behavior.


Credits: 3

Explores social interaction from both the psychological and socio­logical perspectives. It is the study of how we think about, relate to, and interact with each other.


Credits: 3

Reviews national income and output; employment and prices; money and credit; government finance; monetary and fiscal policy; economic growth and development; and international finance.


Credits: 3

Reviews the organization and workings of modern economic sys­tems; the role of markets, prices and competition in the promotion of economic welfare, alternative systems and international trade.


Credits: 3

A survey course applying basic sociological concepts, theories, and methods to examine society, culture, cultural institutions, cultural diversity, and cultural stability and change.


Credits: 3

Applies basic scientific sociological concepts and principles to the examination of contemporary social issues such as crime, poverty, violence, and inequality.


Credits: 3

Review of basic fundamentals of government including federalism, the political process, the presidency, the congress and the judicial system.


Credits: 3

This course provides an introduction to politics, government, and public policy at the state and local level, with particular emphasis on the state of Iowa. It includes an analysis of the relationship among federal, state, and local governments; the structure and powers of state and local governments; the scope of political participation in state and local parties; and public policy-making by state and local governments.


Credits: 3

This course covers the similarities and differences in human societies, from hunting and gathering to industrialized societies. Specific subjects covered include worldview, culture, language, economic systems, marriage, family, and kinship, gender, legal and political structures, religion, and more.


Credits:

Introductory course in college geography dealing with location, interaction and interdependence of countries of the world.


Credits: 3

This course is an introductory course in Iowa History, as it relates to national and international history.  This course examines the natural environment of Iowa, as it shaped and was shaped by the native people, early settlers through the early years, statehood, World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, and more recent years.  Special attention is given to ethnic groups and their contributions.


Credits: 3

An introductory course that studies mass media and society. The class includes a historical and contemporary overview of indus­tries, professions, processes and social effects of the mass media.


Credits: 3

A general introductory course in the fundamental concepts, institu­tions, principles and procedures of political science. Background in classical political theory through exposure to ideas of past politi­cal philosophers (such as Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Marx and others).Studies comparative systems through consid­eration of governments of Great Britain, France and Canada.


Credits: 3

The sociological study of the family and family-related issues in cultural, cross-cultural, historical, and social context.


Credits: 3

A survey course to identify and analyze the variety and extent of global economic, political, social and cultural problems and is­sues.


Credits: 3

Survey of the contributions that various minorities have made to the development of the United States.


Criminal Justice

Credits: 3

Broad examination of the various structures and functions of American Law Enforcement agencies and their functional units. The exploration of police procedures revolves around the topics of discretion, effectiveness and efficiency, and constitutional limits.


Credits: 3

Survey of correctional theory and practice including such topics as: historical foundations of contemporary corrections, applied theory, evaluation research, sentencing and crime prevention.


Credits: 3

Examines the law in the correctional setting with obligations of correctional workers.

Prerequisites: CRJ 120 – Intro to Corrections


Credits: 3

Covers fundamentals of investigation including interviewing and interrogating; collecting and preserving evidence; modus ope­randi; crime scene search; etc.


Credits: 3

This course identifies and discusses the nature of the success­ful cyber-crime investigation and the proper preparation for trial. Students will have a better understanding of current technology used in these crimes.


Credits: 3

This course will introduce the student to the private security pro­fession in America and current trends in the industry.


Credits: 3

Presents the theoretical and philosophical basis of probation, parole and other community based correctional programs.


Credits: 1

Supplemental enrichment course related to Criminal Justice which may include special projects or papers.


Credits: 1

Supplemental enrichment course related to Criminal Justice which includes special projects; projects may include tours, Ride-Along, question and answer sessions with professionals and others af­fected by the criminal justice field.


Credits: 3

Introduction to the 35mm camera: selection and handling; theory of light; lenses and focusing; depth of field and film types; compo­sition; film processing and basic darkroom techniques.


Computers

Credits: 3

In a Windows environment, the focus of this course is to use hardware and software as business productivity tools. Training includes a hands-on introduction to computer applications vital in business and industry .The course covers computer terminol­ogy, operating system, email, and Internet applications .Hands on training is provided for software business applications includ­ing word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation software.


Credits: 3

Provide students with broad understanding of management infor­mation systems in the business environment. Offers more detailed hands-on uses of application programs such as word process­ing, database management and spreadsheets in preparation for careers in business.

Prerequisites: CSC 110 – Intro to Computers and BCA 212 – Intro to Comp Business Apps


Credits: 3

CSC-110 is an introductory course that surveys a variety of topics to include history, hardware, software, terminology, com­munications, computer ethics, and societal impact of computers. In addition to computer literacy, students will complete hands-on modules using operating systems, word processing, database, presentation, and spreadsheet software; such as Microsoft Office programs.


Credits: 3

This course presents the basic concepts of information systems and computer literacy. The course incorporates theory as well as hands-on practice which focuses on spreadsheets and database management systems (DBMS).