COVID-19 INFORMATION

Iowa Lakes Community College will provide regular updates to any COVID-19 policies or procedures to this page as they become available.

For more information regarding COVID-19 Policies at Iowa Lakes contact:

Students

Julie Williams
Executive Dean of Students
712-362-7912

Delaine Hiney
Executive Director of Facilities Management
712-362-0428

Employees

Kathy Muller
Executive Director of Human Resources
712-362-0433

IOWA LAKES COVId-19 uPDATES

March 3, 2021 - Spring Break Travel Information

If you are traveling over Spring Break, check out the COVID specifics for your destination and know your Travel Risk.

Updated Feb. 2, 2021

opens in a new windowhttps://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/travel-risk.html

Travel increases your chances of getting and spreading COVID-19. CDC recommends that you do not travel at this time. Delay travel and stay home to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.

If you must travel, learn which travel activities are safer and take the following steps to  opens in a new windowprotect yourself and others from COVID-19. Keep in mind that getting from one place to another is just one piece of the travel risk. Your activities and who you interact with before, during, and after travel may increase your risk.

opens in a new windowKnow when you should not travel. Do not travel if you or your travel companions are sick, have tested positive for COVID-19, or were exposed to a person with COVID-19.

The transportation you use, type of accommodation you stay in, and the activities you do during travel can increase your risk of getting and spreading COVID-19. Your chances of getting or spreading COVID-19 while traveling also are higher if you come into  opens in a new windowclose contact with others, especially people you don’t know, or use shared public facilities like restrooms. COVID-19 is spreading in the United States and in  opens in a new windowmany international destinations. Visiting locations where there are fewer cases of COVID-19 may be safer than visiting locations where there are more cases of COVID-19.

All air passengers coming to the United States, including U.S. citizens, are required to have a negative COVID-19 test result or documentation of recovery from COVID-19 before boarding a flight to the United States. See the  opens in a new windowFrequently Asked Questions  for more information.

Transportation

Your chances of getting COVID-19 while traveling depends not only on the length of the trip and the number of stops, but also on whether you and those around you take precautions, such as  opens in a new windowwearing masks and staying at least 6 feet /2 meters (about 2 arm lengths) from other people. Airports, bus and train stations, and rest stops are all places travelers can be exposed to the virus  opens in a new windowthrough respiratory droplets or on surfaces. These are also places where it can be hard to  opens in a new windowkeep your distance. In general, the longer you are around a person with COVID-19, even if they do not have symptoms, the more likely you are to get infected.

When traveling  opens in a new windowwear a mask for the duration of your trip and at your destination.  opens in a new windowMasks are required on planes, buses, trains, and other forms of public transportation traveling into, within, or out of the United States and in U.S. transportation hubs such as airports and stations.

During car travel, making stops along the way for gas, food, or bathroom breaks can put you and your traveling companions in close contact with other people and frequently touched surfaces. If traveling in a RV, you may have to stop less often for food or bathroom breaks, but you could still be in close contact with others while staying at RV parks overnight and while getting gas and supplies at public places.

Traveling on buses and trains for any length of time can involve sitting or standing within 6 feet/2 meters of others, which may increase your risk of getting COVID-19. If you choose to travel by bus or train, learn what you can do to  opens in a new windowprotect yourself on public transportation.

Air travel requires spending time in security lines and airport terminals, which can bring you in close contact with other people and frequently touched surfaces. Most viruses and other germs do not spread easily on flights because of how air circulates and is filtered on airplanes. However, keeping your distance is difficult on crowded flights, and sitting within 6 feet/2 meters of others, sometimes for hours, may make you more likely to get COVID-19.

Traveling Internationally? All air passengers coming to the United States, including U.S. citizens, are required to have a negative COVID-19 test result or documentation of recovery from COVID-19 before boarding a flight to the United States, see the  opens in a new windowFrequently Asked Questions about this requirement for more information.

Check CDC’s  opens in a new windowCOVID-19 Travel Recommendations by Destination before planning your trip.

opens in a new windowhttps://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#state-report-profile

opens in a new windowhttps://beta.healthdata.gov/browse?tags=covid-19-spr

December 9, 2020 - Quarantine Guideline Change

Iowa Public Health clarified the guidelines for being released from quarantine.

Clarification of early quarantine release and masking

  • When someone comes back early from quarantine (ie. 7 or 10 days instead of 14) Public Health requires the person to wear a mask through day 14 while they are around other people. 
  • If the person wants to do an activity during this time where they can't/won't wear a mask (e.g. sports), then they can't play the sport during that time. 
  • If you can't/won't wear a mask during a specific activity, you can't do the activity during this time. 
  • If you can't/won't wear a mask at all, you need to stay home through day 14.  Masks and social distancing will still be required when on campus.

Quarantine can end after Day 10 if no symptoms have been reported during daily monitoring

  • testing is not required
  • continue to monitor for symptoms until the end of the 14 days
  • it is recommended to wear a mask, social distance, and wash hands frequently until the end of the 14 days

Quarantine can end after Day 7 if no symptoms have been reported during daily monitoring AND if you have tested negative for COVID-19

  • the COVID-19 test must be collected on Day 5 or later after the exposure
  • continue to monitor for symptoms until the end of the 14 days
  • it is recommended to wear a mask, social distance, and wash hands frequently until the end of the 14 days
DECEMBER 2, 2020 - QUARANTINE GUIDELINE CHANGE

The CDC (Center for Disease Control) made changes in the quarantine guidelines.

Persons quarantined due to a possible or known exposure to COVID-19 have been required to isolate for 14 days. The following options to shorten quarantine are now acceptable.

  • Quarantine can end after Day 10 without testing and if no symptoms have been reported during daily monitoring.
  • Quarantine can end after Day 7 if a person tests on Day 5 with negative results and no symptoms have been reported during daily monitoring.
  • In both cases, you must continue to monitor symptoms and mask through Day 14.

The new guidelines apply to those currently in quarantine. This is for quarantine only! No changes have been made to the isolation guidelines.

opens in a new windowhttps://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/more/scientific-brief-options-to-reduce-quarantine.html

NOVEMBER 3, 2020 - GAITERS & FACE SHIELDS UPDATE

The CDC has updated their guidelines regarding the use of gaiters and face shields. 

Iowa Lakes will allow the use of gaiters when the following applies: 

For a gaiter to be considered effective it should be made with 2-layers of fabric, or a single layer gaiter folded over to make two layers. Gaiters must cover your entire nose and mouth. 

September 29, 2020 - Quarantine Guidance Change

The Iowa Department of Public Health notified local public health departments that it is making a change to the Iowa quarantine recommendations for people who have been exposed to a positive case of COVID-19, and Public Health is implementing this change, effective immediately. 

  • Close contacts of COVID-positive cases will no longer need to quarantine for 14 days if a face covering was consistently worn by both people during the exposure.  However, the recommendation is still to follow the social distancing requirement of six or more feet.
  • Household/residential contacts and contacts in health care settings will still have the 14-day quarantine recommendation, due to the fact that most likely face coverings were not worn by both parties. 
  • Any type of face covering is acceptable; however, a face shield is not considered a face covering and quarantine is still required if one or both people were wearing a face shield only. 
  • People currently in quarantine may discontinue that quarantine if both people were wearing a face covering during the time of exposure. 
  • This is not a replacement for social distancing, but it should reduce the number of quarantines in school and work settings. 
  • This does NOT change the isolation requirements for people that are actually sick or COVID-positive to isolate from others until: 
    o They have had no fever for at least 24 hours (that is one full day of no fever without the use of medicine that reduces fevers) and their other symptoms have improved, AND 
    o At least 10 days have passed since their symptoms first appeared OR since they had a positive COVID test if they are asymptomatic. 

This decision was made by the Iowa Department of Public Health based on observations within Iowa and some other states that when the COVID-positive case and close contacts were both wearing face coverings at the time of exposure, the contacts were much less likely to develop illness or later test positive. IDPH wants to emphasize the importance of wearing face coverings consistently and correctly, with it covering both the nose and the mouth. Other recommendations such as social distancing, staying home when you are sick, and frequently washing or disinfecting hands continue to be important practices to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

September 29, 2020 
COVID-19 update | New guidelines from Iowa Department of Public Health

The Iowa Department of Public Health provided new guidelines today about who needs to quarantine after being exposed to an individual that tests positive for COVID.

  1. Always wear your face covering over your nose and mouth.  A face shield is not considered a face covering.
  2. Maintain the social distancing guidelines of at least 6’.  If you are within 6’ for more than 15 minutes make sure everyone is wearing a mask that continually covers their nose and mouth.
  3. By wearing your face covering over your nose and mouth, you can stop your entire class/program/team from being quarantined!  Even if you have violated the social distancing criteria.    

DO NOT wear a mask: around your neck, on your forehead, under your nose, only on your nose, on your chin, dangling from one ear, on your arm.

DO choose masks that: have 2 or more layers of washable, breathable fabric; completely cover your nose and mouth; fit snugly against the sides of your face and don't have gaps.

Special Situations: Glasses -- if you wear glasses, find a mask that fits closely over your nose or one that has a nose wire to limit fogging.

Find more information on the CDC website: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/about-face-coverings.html