Human Services

Do you enjoy working with people and helping them reach their goals? Then a career in Human Services may be a great fit for you. Pursue an Associate in Applied Science degree in a field that is projected to grow in demand over the next few years, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor. Our Human Services Program consists of four terms plus work experience, preparing you for a variety of career opportunities.

Develop skills in planning and case management, assessment and referrals, interviewing and behavioral observations, and working with individuals and groups. Become familiar with learning and behavior disabilities, mental illness, dementia and other related disorders. Whether you choose to work in a treatment center, social service agency or supported living program, you’ll develop the foundational skills you need right here while earning your Associate in Applied Science degree.

Practical experience along with the advanced coursework during the second year ensures that you know what to expect when entering the workforce and, even better, that you’ll be ready for it. Upon graduation, you’ll be ready for entry-level employment or to transfer to a four-year college or university. If you transfer to a four-year institution, you may choose to specialize your skill-set by focusing on social work, psychology, counseling or education/special education.

Faculty Contact

Amy Ver Mulm
Professor, Human Services/Disabilities
712-362-7977 Ext: 7977 | avermulm@iowalakes.educreate new email

Program Details

PROGRAM LENGTH: 5 terms

DEGREE: Associate in Applied Science (69 credits)

CAMPUS: Estherville

Internship/Practicum

Did You Know?

Starting Salary $23,054

Average Salary: $35,028

Projected Employment Growth: 1.4%

Online availability 100%

What you'll learn

In the Human Services Program at Iowa Lakes, you will learn how to:1

  1. Explore the role of human services in society.
  2. Examine the disciplines of psychology and sociology and their connection to human services.
  3. Apply the skills of assessment, planning, referral and monitoring.
  4. Demonstrate interviewing techniques.
  5. Differentiate between an urgent and non-urgent client situation.
  6. Implement documentation, case notes and goal writing.
  7. Practice ethics and confidentiality evaluations.

1The What You’ll Learn section of our website provides a description of Learning Outcomes for students who successfully complete all requirements for obtaining a Human Services Program Associate in Applied Sciences degree from Iowa Lakes Community College.

Curriculum

Term 1

Credits: 3

Students will develop the beginning skills of observing and man­aging the behavior of others individually or in groups. This course introduces students to beginning behavior teaching methods and situations. Teaches how-to skills, such as observing, recording, designing, implementing and evaluating behavior programs.


Credits: 3

Emphasis on expository and argumentative writings including a review of usage and mechanics.

Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on the ACT, Accuplacer, ASSET,COMPASS as determined by Iowa Lakes policy


Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the value base of human ser­vices and helping professions. Addresses strategies and prac­tices used in assessing and evaluating client needs, establishing and identifying resources and making appropriate referrals. In­take interviews and assessments are explored. Students will de­velop knowledge and basic skills in the area of programming and developing support systems and community resources. Students will increase awareness of working with high risk populations.


Credits: 3

An introduction to the scientific study of behavior; a brief history of psychology as a science, and topics fundamental to human behavior including developmental issues, sensory abilities, cogni­tive performance, social and emotional factors in behavior, and abnormal behavior and therapies.


Credits: 3

The fundamentals course develops the basic skills involved in a variety of communication situations, including oral presentations and interpersonal speaking.  Emphasis is placed on organization, audience analysis, vocal and physical delivery, listening, nonverbal communication, critical thinking, and methods of dealing with communication apprehension through class discussion and activities.


Term 2

Credits: 3

CSC-110 is an introductory course that surveys a variety of topics to include history, hardware, software, terminology, com­munications, computer ethics, and societal impact of computers. In addition to computer literacy, students will complete hands-on modules using operating systems, word processing, database, presentation, and spreadsheet software; such as Microsoft Office programs.


Credits: 4

This is an introductory course in applied counseling techniques. Students are introduced to a variety of facilitative skills and counseling concepts and work through the interviewing process in simulated helping services settings.


Credits: 3

This is an introductory course in applied counseling techniques. Students are introduced to a variety of facilitative skills and counseling concepts and work through the interviewing process in simulated helping service settings.


Credits: 3

Continuation of ENG 105 with emphasis on research and docu­mentation as well as literary analysis.

Prerequisites: ENG 105 – Composition I


Credits: 3

Introduces classifications, etiology, characteristics, educational and vocational considerations of persons with disabilities.


Choose either DSV 160 or HSV 225

Term 3

Credits: 3, 4, 6

Practical field experience in phases of operation and duties relat­ing to human services, paraeducation, health or rehabilitation. Focus is program writing, data collection, documentation, job skills, and participant outcome.


Credits: 3

Studies medical terminology, including spelling and definitions.


Term 4

Credits: 3

Students are given the opportunity to apply human relations concepts and evaluate experience and observations. Social skills required in various occupational settings will be developed, emphasizing how appropriate personal attitudes lead to social and business success.


Credits: 4

Focus is on available support services and vocational aspects of rehabilitation. Content includes identification of job tasks, occu­pational characteristics and job matching. Students gain under­standing of the need for services and the referral process. Job analysis and labor market surveys are completed. Students will develop an appreciation of the psychosocial adjustment aspects of living with a disability. This course will cover both physical and mental disabilities and services available. Students will participate with Service Learning projects.


Credits: 3

Studies human development from conception through the lifes­pan. Physical, emotional, social, cognitive and moral aspects are studied in the classroom, by lecture, file/video, projects, and observation and by reading the literature.


Credits: 3

Juvenile justice system is examined from historical constitutional and operational perspectives. Theories concerning juvenile delin­quency are explored.


Credits: 3

Survey of the American criminal justice system, the early, middle and late stages of the criminal justice system are analyzed within the framework of law and research.


Credits: 3

Applies basic scientific sociological concepts and principles to the examination of contemporary social issues such as crime, poverty, violence, and inequality.


Choose either PSY 121, CRJ 201 or CRJ 100
Math: 3 credits

Term 5

Credits: 3

Survey of the American criminal justice system, the early, middle and late stages of the criminal justice system are analyzed within the framework of law and research.


Credits: 3

Juvenile justice system is examined from historical constitutional and operational perspectives. Theories concerning juvenile delin­quency are explored.


Credits: 4

This course provides a foundation of statistical concepts and pro­cedures that can aid the student as both a consumer and produc­er of statistical information. The course emphasizes descriptive and inferential statistical methods, probability, estimation, hypoth­esis testing and linear regression. Students are also introduced to software as it applies to introductory statistical methods.

Prerequisites
appropriate placement score


Credits: 3

Goals, values and legal aspects of the social work profession­als. Roles of social workers in human service institutions. Service learning experience at an agency is included.


Credits: 3

The sociological study of the family and family-related issues in cultural, cross-cultural, historical, and social context.


Credits: 3

An introductory course in social welfare systems and social work practice that surveys the historical development of the social work profession in conjunction with the development of the social wel­fare services in the United States.


Credits: 3

A survey course applying basic sociological concepts, theories, and methods to examine society, culture, cultural institutions, cultural diversity, and cultural stability and change.


Credits: 3

Survey of the contributions that various minorities have made to the development of the United States.


Choose either CRJ 100, CRJ 201 or MAT 157
Choose either SOC 160 or SOC 110